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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
ok short and sweet.
it was raining recently and when i went to start it the idle was very low and it was running very hard, so to the shop i went!
the computer sent the error message of #3 cylander misfire. and it turned out that there was moisture in the coil. as soon as it dried the thing ran fine but the guy said that we need to get the coil replaced and it would be like 400 to do it becaus it was a cylander on the inboard side and the have to take the header off to get to it... i smell b.s. HELP do i have any other options to keep water out of my engine (barring a garage all you smart arses out there)

thanks very much in advance.
 

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You don't have moisture in your engine. The moisture is in the coil-on-plug (COP) that sits on top of each spark plug and fires the plug. It's quite common for these COP's to develop cracks in their plastic shells from the heat and vibration of the engine. Then water gets into the cracks and the coil stops working. If you're handy with tools you can replace the coil yourself for the cost of a new COP, about $120 each at the dealer or generic ones for about $30 each online, but then you'll have to wait for them to arrive by mail.

You don't want to drive your Escape when it's misfiring. The misfire allows raw gasoline to pass into the exhaust system and can ruin the catalytic converter. Replacing a cat can be really expensive.

$400 to replace one COP sounds high to me. A good mechanic can do the work in about 1 hour and figure the part at $120. I think $200 to $250 would be about right. I recommend you replace all three of the back or "inboard" COP's as long as you're in there.
 

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Just had PO0301 code, indicating a misfire on cylinder #1. Decided to have my mechanic change all six plugs while he was in there, and get the COP on the back three plugs replaced. When he priced the COPs at $138 each, I quickly retreated back to just changing the one on the misfiring cylinder.
 

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You don't say what year your car is, but if your mechanic already has the intake manifold off to change one COP, change the other back two at the same time. It's not a question of if, it's when they will also go bad.

No sense in paying the labor twice or three times.

On my '02 Tribute, I changed the front three one at a time, as they went bad. When the first back COP went, I had them change plugs and coils on all three.
 
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