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Tools needed:

  • 19 mm socket (wheels, tie rod end retaining nut)[/*]
  • 98 ft-lb torque wrench (lug nuts)[/*]
  • Needle-nosed pliers (cotter pin)[/*]
  • Tie rod end remover (can substitute standard puller)[/*]
  • 15 mm open end wrench (tie rod)[/*]
  • Adjustable wrench (jam nut; should use an open ended wrench, but I did not have the correct size - looks like 24 mm)[/*]
  • 37 ft-lb torque wrench (retaining nut)[/*]
  • Permanent marker (indexing the tie rod)[/*]
  • Penetrating solvent (WD-40 is no good)[/*]
  • The Big Hammer(TM)[/*]
  • New tie rod end (not pictured)[/*]
  • Two jack stands and string (for alignment)[/*]

  1. Remove the wheels.


    [/*]
  2. Remove the cotter pin.


    [/*]
  3. Spray penetrant on both the jam nut and the castellated retaining nut.


    [/*]
  4. Draw a line along the top of the tie rod to allow you to keep track of how many turns you have made.

    [/*]
  5. Loosen the jam nut (turn clockwise to loosen). If the tie rod turns along with the jam nut, return the tie rod to the original position using the marker line.


    [/*]
  6. Loosen the castellated nut, but do not completely remove. This makes it easier to center the puller and won't allow the tie rod end to fly up into your face.


    [/*]
  7. Using the puller, break the tie rod loose from the steering knuckle. Remove the castellated nut and lift the tie rod away.

    [/*]
  8. Unscrew the tie rod end, spraying more penetrant if necessary. Count the number of turns you make so that you can get your alignment back into roughly the same setting.

    [/*]
  9. Clean any rust from the steering knuckle.


    [/*]
  10. Screw the new tie rod end onto the tie rod the same number of turns it took to remove the old one. Tighten the new castellated nut to 41 ft-lbs (55 N-m) and insert the cotter pin. Leave the jam nut loosened for now.


    [/*]
  11. Replace the wheel and tighten two to three lug nuts, then lower the car completely. Using two jack stands and a string, stretch the string across both the front and rear tires. Check that there are four contact points with the sidewall; raise the vehicle and adjust the tie rod as necessary. I needed a half turn clockwise to get my alignment into an acceptable setting.


    [/*]
  12. Tighten the jam nut to 35 ft-lbs (47 N-m), grease the tie rod end if there is a grease zerk, and get an alignment done.[/*]
 

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Step 8 . Unscrew the Tie Rod End.

It should unscrew easily. PB Blaster should loosen it up. Mine did not.

If you cannot unscrew the tie rod end get a bottle MAPP gas and heat the tie rod end for a few minutes. It will loosen and you can probably spin it by hand. (Wear an oven mitt).

I also used a pipe wrench on the inner tie laying on the sway bar to keep it from spinning while unscrewing the outer tie rod end.

This job could (should) be easier than a brake job. Do both sides, if one is gone the other is not far behind.
 

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Alternate 7. With a 2nd BFH behind the knuckle arm, smack the end of the knuckle arm such that the metal "loop" surrounding the tie rod taper is compressed between the two hammers. It should pop loose with one solid hit. This will not damage the knuckle arm.
 

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edmagee said:
Step 8 . Unscrew the Tie Rod End.

It should unscrew easily. PB Blaster should loosen it up. Mine did not.

If you cannot unscrew the tie rod end get a bottle MAPP gas and heat the tie rod end for a few minutes. It will loosen and you can probably spin it by hand. (Wear an oven mitt).

I also used a pipe wrench on the inner tie laying on the sway bar to keep it from spinning while unscrewing the outer tie rod end.

This job could (should) be easier than a brake job. Do both sides, if one is gone the other is not far behind.
This is my major headache. The TREs are not free on the ITE shaft. It took me almost an hour to remove the DS and after much deliberation I went to the PS and it is frozen solid; so much so that the largest vice grip with the most pressure that I could clamp it with did not sustain the torque that I put on it and fudged the straights on that PS ITE shaft used for the alignment adjust. I was just about to invest another $100 for a new ITE (which does not require replacement) and 2 different TR removal tools, just so that I can replace that entire linkage assembly rather than give-up and allow a pro' to complete the R&R on the outer TRE replacement. Now I have 1 more option to attempt the removal with some heat. I'm glad that I saw this because I could think of no alternative. TY sir!
 

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CHUBBS said:
edmagee said:
Step 8 . Unscrew the Tie Rod End.

It should unscrew easily. PB Blaster should loosen it up. Mine did not.

If you cannot unscrew the tie rod end get a bottle MAPP gas and heat the tie rod end for a few minutes. It will loosen and you can probably spin it by hand. (Wear an oven mitt).

I also used a pipe wrench on the inner tie laying on the sway bar to keep it from spinning while unscrewing the outer tie rod end.

This job could (should) be easier than a brake job. Do both sides, if one is gone the other is not far behind.
This is my major headache. The TREs are not free on the ITE shaft. It took me almost an hour to remove the DS and after much deliberation I went to the PS and it is frozen solid; so much so that the largest vice grip with the most pressure that I could clamp it with did not sustain the torque that I put on it and fudged the straights on that PS ITE shaft used for the alignment adjust. I was just about to invest another $100 for a new ITE (which does not require replacement) and 2 different TR removal tools, just so that I can replace that entire linkage assembly rather than give-up and allow a pro' to complete the R&R on the outer TRE replacement. Now I have 1 more option to attempt the removal with some heat. I'm glad that I saw this because I could think of no alternative. TY sir!
Update to my posting:
Heat from a simple butane torch was all it took to expand the TRE threads to get it moving. I applied heat for about 2-mins & off she came. This simple method saved me a lot of trouble. I thought heat was only useful for rusty & corroded nuts & bolts. I wasn't aware that threads just tighten up & sieze without some type of environmental influence but there must be something with dissimilar metals shrinking together. Fortunately, just a little heat is all that's needed. I cannot stress how much of a relief that I was overcome with as that old part freed itself. I will forever have a butane torch in my arsenal.
 
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