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Hi all, my name is Sal and I have a 2007 4-cylinder Manual Transmission Escape with 130,000 Miles.

I have always made it a habit of completing a tune-up on any car I purchase, but I am also a believer in the "if it ain't broke, don't fix it" mindset. I am unsure of what to do in this case; any advice is appreciated.

I do not know the maintenance history, but I do know that it was a fleet vehicle for some time. It runs EXCEPTIONALLY smooth with a nice idle. A/C operation sometimes makes it vibrate very slightly but nothing that seems out of the ordinary.

So, would you do a tune-up at this point in time? I'm not sure I want to replace OEM stuff with Aftermarket items if the current equipment is in fine working order. No way I am paying $74.99 for Motorcraft Ignition Coils on Rock auto when Bosch premiums are $20 bucks - but I know the Motorcrafts are probably the "right" choice. But if the originals are fine still, should I bother?

Really just thinking out loud here, but any advice would be appreciated.
 

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With it being right around the time many things would be done for the first time, I would do normal maintenance stuff, but beyond that the "if it ain't broke, don't break it" is a good plan.

I bought a car that was "all up to date" on maintenance and I guess their definition of maintenance was oil changes. It was over due or due for nearly everything. Okay with me I knew where I stood once I did it all.

coolant which should be Premium Gold is 100,000 miles (you can test what is in it now)
spark plugs 100,000 (check them, easy to get to, I would never check them without just replacing them)
pcv 100,000

check the serpentine belt.

I don't know the interval for the transmission fluid, the maintenance schedule shows 100k for all but the Escape, and doesn't show it anyplace else. If 4wd I would check the PTU and rear diff, which is at 150k

I wouldn't proactively replace the coils, but maybe on the Escape I would keep an eye on them, I think the issue with the driver in the PCM going bad is caused by the coils going bad. I had 330,000 miles on a car I finally stopped working on and it had 6 of 8 original coils, 2 went bad from swimming in coolant from leaks.
 

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Buy 4 new double platinum Motorcraft or Autolite spark plugs. Check the gap and adjust if necessary. Remove the COPs, blow out the recess with compressed air(keeps any stuff from falling into the cylinder), and remove the plug. Tighten until the plug bottoms and then go 1/8 turn past. Put a dab of dielectric grease into the COP boot, smear around the inner surface, and put the COP back in place.
That's all you need tune-up wise. Check the air filter to see if you can see 'light' when you hold it up to a bulb or a sun. It should allow light through. If not, replace. Check the manual for recommended PCV valve replacement interval. If you don't know, replace it if suggested.
I would also check all underhood liquid levels. If the coolant is discolored, drain and replace, insuring whatever is in the system when done is at least 50:50. I think the manual may suggest flushing the brake system, but most people ignore this for the life of the vehicle.
tom
 

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Hi all, my name is Sal and I have a 2007 4-cylinder Manual Transmission Escape with 130,000 Miles.

I have always made it a habit of completing a tune-up on any car I purchase, but I am also a believer in the "if it ain't broke, don't fix it" mindset. I am unsure of what to do in this case; any advice is appreciated.

I do not know the maintenance history, but I do know that it was a fleet vehicle for some time. It runs EXCEPTIONALLY smooth with a nice idle. A/C operation sometimes makes it vibrate very slightly but nothing that seems out of the ordinary.

So, would you do a tune-up at this point in time? I'm not sure I want to replace OEM stuff with Aftermarket items if the current equipment is in fine working order. No way I am paying $74.99 for Motorcraft Ignition Coils on Rock auto when Bosch premiums are $20 bucks - but I know the Motorcrafts are probably the "right" choice. But if the originals are fine still, should I bother?

Really just thinking out loud here, but any advice would be appreciated.
Hey Sal

My 2007 has 225,000, just replaced the plugs for the second time and all 4 original coils are fine.
Like someone else said, stick w/ the stock plug – the Motorcraft and Autolites are made in the same factory. I've read that going w/ another "performance" brand could shorten the life of the coils and will not provide any of the sexy benefits touted. Full disclosure, my valve cover gasket and spark plug tubes (one kit) were bad, so 3 of the coils had been bathing in motor oil for who knows how long but, still o.k.

I've been dealing with a high-idle in cold temps for too long now. We finally narrowed it down to the PCV valve which, unfortunately is behind the intake manifold. I hope you do not run into this issue but if you do, ping me back. Thanks. Good luck w/ your new/old Escape!!
 

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StevenF, I hope you replaced the 'boots' on the end of the COPs. Once they have been bathed in motor oil, they generally lose some portion of their dielectric capability and end up allowing the spark to escape the the walls of the plug well.
If you notice misfire occurring randomly after doing the work, check the boots for damage. They are not expensive and are somewhat easy to access in a 4. Not so much for the v6.
tom
 

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Wow, 225K & still in service. Duratec engines are tough. I've seen them going up to 300K+ miles among Ford Transit fleets. If one vintage Volvo car does a 1M+ miles, I believe given the proper care Diuratec engines could do that too,
 
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