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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I searched and could not find anything on my issue.
Electric power steering is out, I have no codes for the EPAS (B2278 not present). However, I decided to replace the torque sensor as this was exhibiting the symptoms of the torque sensor being bad.
Well, that did not fix the issue.
I do have the battery light on and a code P0625 (Generator Field / F Terminal Circuit Low). The battery light has been on for some time, but every time I check, the alternator is charging fine (13.9v +/-)
I am planning on replacing the alternator / regulator. Could this be my issue with the power steering as well?
The only other thing I can think of would be the power steering module under the dash, but that is basically just an electric motor, so I really can't see that going out completely...

Any help or advice would be appreciated.
 

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If the problem is that you have no electric assist for steering, and no code, and a fault code for the field current, AND replacing the steering controller did bupkis, I would suspect a wiring problem. Could even be the feed from the relay/fuse block under hood near the battery. Or fuses. switches. relays.
Either corrosion, poor ground, small critters having a snack, or actual damage from road debris or other 'things' could cause problems getting power through/to the controller, thence to the motor, along with a FIELD wire sens problem.
Reading about the 625, sensing the voltage provided to energize the field windings, a broken wire could cause the 'sense' wire to the computer to be damaged, thus the code, and other wires in or near the same portion of the loom to have damage, thus causing the power-outage in the steering system.
Did you inspect the replaced steering sensor, measuring the ohms in the sweeps? I don't know, but suspect they are similar to the double-sweep used in throttle control, where one increases the ohms while the other decreases the ohms doing a sweep from closed to WOT, and the steering would do the same when swept from lock-to-lock. Of course, in your hand, you'd have to figure out where to measure, and how to make it sweep. I have no suggestions.
I would suggest going to bbbind dot com, registering, and searching for a copy of your wiring schematic. Peruse as desired, and find test points for appropriate voltage for the steering & alternator circuits. Inform as desired.
tom
 

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for what its worth, when my idler pulley broke for the 2nd time and the belt fell off, obviously the alternator wasn't being turned. after driving straight to my local mechanic, the power steering cut out just prior to turning in. I'm assuming if your battery isn't charging and is dying, the electric power steering is one of the casualties. However, you will know in a hurry if its the alternator that's bad. any update?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I do have an alternator code, but the battery is charging just fine and have not had to jump the vehicle ever.
I check the alternator on a weekly basis to make sure the battery is charging. I just purchased a steering column and will be replacing that today in hopes that this will fix the EPAS problem. I will then get an alternator and tackle that monster job in a couple of weeks...
 

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I do not know if it was made clear, but the 'varying' voltage that a failing alternator/regulator can produce could be affecting the power steering. I suspect the gizmos inside will work with a range of voltages, but it's possible yours is out of range. Hopefully, you didn't cook the bits & pieces with intermittent highs and lows. Low voltage will cause the amperage passing through to be higher, which can affect things, at least some things. Ditto for high voltage, depending on the load and design.
Any way, I'd want to get the schematic, and run the test series Ford uses to determine if the problem is the supplied voltage, or something else. I'd also go through their problem tree to determine the condition of the alternator and regulator. I understand that some 'rebuilt' alternators re-use the same regulator if it appears to test 'good'. Were it me... I'd get new regulator, new brushes, and inspect the diode array very carefully, replacing depending on $$ figures, and it can all be done in your garage or basement. The diode array would likely need soldering if being replaced. You can also stuff some grease into the bearings if you wish, if they are found to be dry. Spin the armature and see if the bearings are smooth. If they are, grease and PBT. Use a length of wire to hold back the brushes on assembly, and pull the wire after it is all bolted together.
You would then know that what you spent all that time doing a R&R will work, and will work well for a good long while. Better than seeing if BobbySue did his/her job well late Friday afternoon after a long liquid lunch...
tom
 

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patsfan1704 said:
for what its worth, when my idler pulley broke for the 2nd time and the belt fell off, obviously the alternator wasn't being turned. after driving straight to my local mechanic, the power steering cut out just prior to turning in. I'm assuming if your battery isn't charging and is dying, the electric power steering is one of the casualties. However, you will know in a hurry if its the alternator that's bad. any update?
Happened to me last year, Idler pulley broke off. My left hand was on the steering wheel when I started the vehicle and I felt like a "pulse" on the steering wheel, then suddenly I heard a "pop" noise on the engine bay. Turned off the engine to investigate and the idler pulley is on the ground. Had to have the vehicle towed to a Ford dealer. I found out the culprit was the "Electric Power Steering". From then on, every time I start my Escape I make sure my left hand is not holding the steering wheel. Note: my right hand is on the ignition key :lol:
Cost me somewhere around $1500 parts & labor
 
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