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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
06 Escape limited. I picked this SUV up on a song. Previous owner says car runs and drives just fine,, then after a time the transmission just looses everything and it’s like it’s in neutral. Pull over to side of the road and let it sit and cool, once cold, everything returns.

He stated he took it to an independent shop to get a quote on getting transmission replaced, but they told him they diagnosed it as some block sensor located in or near the valve body of the transmission that needed to be replaced.

I have not experienced the issue first hand because I believe him, and have no desire to lose my gears out somewhere. I’d certainly love to get an opinion or two of current experienced owners who may have heard of such an issue. (I did scour the net on the issue which brought me here to an old topic with the same exact issue, but they said they just got the transmission replaced so I didnt get a solution) Unless my transmission is shot as well?
fluid level full and looks fairly clean. Open to anything
 

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The fluid must be totally hot to check the level. As mentioned multiple times, there is a 'reservoir' built into the transmission that will hold some amount of fluid out of the normal amount at the bottom. There is a thermal valve that closes to contain the fluid so the level overall does not get too high. The internal volume of the 'sump' holds x amount when cold, but when hot, the volume is too much for it to stay in the sump without getting foamed by rotating parts. Thus the 'reservoir'. It holds hot fluid, lowering the level in the sump to where there's no foaming.
That is one possible cause of the loss of drive. The other is leaking clutch pack seals, or internal seals in general.
A final thought is the pump drive shaft. It fits into a spline in the center of the torque converter, and one in the pump. The splines can wear, and lose their power transferring capability, and the pump quits turning, and no pressure==no drive.
The valve body is mounted behind the 'pan' on the front side of the transmission and can be R&R without tearing the transmission totally apart, I think. The solenoids that are bolted to the valve body can be replaced readily.
As I understand, if there are codes, the transmission will not 'remember' them after the key is turned to OFF. If you have a scan tool, and experience the failure, check codes before turning things off.
I would make sure the fluid is at the proper leve when hot, say 180F. Fluid should not run over 200 for any length of time, I think.
tom
 

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Tom's advice is the best place to start. Only thing I would add, is that it sounds like when the fluid heats up enough, you have too much volume, hence it's overfilled.
I did notice you say the fluid level was "full", generally this isn't desired. You want the level to be in the middle of the hash mark area when hot. And hot is easiest to identify without tools by seeing the coolant gauge at around half way mark, probably from 25-30 minutes of driving.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Well I think the seller told me a tale, imagine that. Finally got the car off the trailer today and the transmission is slipping so badly (cold) that it took me forever to get it into the driveway. He said it would be just fine until the car got hot then quit. Not slipping ice cold.

the fluid is nice and pink. He probably flushed it trying all he could to get it working.

my new question is, can I get it hot just by letting the car sit and idle so I can check it properly? And am I supposed to have the car in drive to check the level? If it needs to be driven to get it hot,,,,,, well l that ain’t happenin.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Obviously no quick fix or magic unicorn farts here for me. I’m pulling the transmission next weekend and will begin the disassembly process. Was half tempted to just get another one from the bone yard and swap them, but the curiosity is getting the better of me.
I will update this thread in the coming weeks to post my findings for future google searches
 

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It sounds like pulling the unit is your best bet at making it work correctly. I have been in this position just this summer and they aren’t terrible to pull. But do require a decent effort.
Good luck!
 

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Trucker, if you want to know how to work on the CD4E, you can watch about a half-dozen(?) videos on YT made by Hiram Gutierrez on his 'automatic transmission' channel. He put a lot of time and effort into producing what I think is an excellent tutorial. He does all the steps, including replacing the bushings, all, and I think the thrust washers/bearings. Or washers with bearings, not sure.
There is a kit by aftermarket, Sonnex, that improves the operation, and adds pressure relief passages, valve, and springs to prevent ballooning the converter. I think. Not memorized.
Were I doing mine, I would get the kit if you can find one. About $30, I think.
I just watched a YT in the install of the kit, and it was explained well, along with the disassembly, modification, and re-assembly of the valve body.
Well, it was Hiram again:

tom
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hi Tom and Zero

yes I have been googling this (and that is how I found this forum matter of factly) and I found about half a dozen of your previous posts scattered here on this site, where I have learned a ton. I also found I have an oil leak somewhere on the back side of the engine so I think pulling the engine/transmission as one unit will be my best bet. Then I can reseal and do the typical water pump/timing chain/seals/gaskets stuff to the engine while I have it out. Looks like it would be a good time to do the spark plus as well.

I have never rebuilt a transmission. In my early wrenching days as a mechanic, we always sent these problems to a transmission shop. But now the day and age of the internet is here, I see no reason why not to diy. I read about the cleanliness and etc that needs to be maintained, so I think I should be in great shape. Plus the helpful people here if I get stumped is also a bonus.
 

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There are few places for leakage... front cover & seal, cam covers, pan gasket, and rear main. Likely cam cover seepage, FWIW. There are O-shaped rings around the plugs. Likely the seals have hardened and no longer function.
If / when you take your CD apart, I can only recommend placing all the bits & pieces in a line on newspaper, flattened cardboard, or other cleanish surface. Pick a way to arrrange any thrust washers, all laying on their front/back, so you can be sure to put them back the way they came. If any splines show damage, such as being twisted... replace the parts. Used parts from a transmission shop are a totally acceptable practice. If you can find one that is willing to share knowledge, they may look at questionable parts, and suggest replacement as appropriate. Some will even help with the clutch packs. A press is very handy, and they may help out for reasonable fee. They will/may also sell good used bits & pieces that are generally only OEM. I was offered a job last time I did an A4LD. Do replace all the bushings as they are cheap and keep all the parts aligned to prevent excessive fluid leakage and loss of pressure to make the parts move.
tom
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thank you Tom. i watched that video of the reassembly and I think I’m going to invest into a press from harbor freight sub $200 for both the machine and a press tool kit. I’m a truck driver now but I like to buy broken vehicles and tinker with them now I have a garage once again. I THINK I’m getting a cherry picker for Christmas lol, so I might drag it out till then before I pull it all out.

today I’m going to drop the side cover and have a look
 

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The press force needed for the clutch packs is not that great. Most, all that I know of, are done using a 'foot press'. Step on the pedal, and the press part comes down and squeezes the clutch pack together so a circlip can be installed. The job can be done using C-clamps and some fabri-cobbling. One thing on the A4LD was getting the lips of the seals pointing the right way. Pay very close attention as you take things apart, and ditto on assembly. Thrust washers and 'torrington' bearings, same thing.
tom
 
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