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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Believe it or not your stock escape comes with a CAI. The airbox gets it's intake air from behind the left head light. General speaking the design is enough for the stock engine but intakes look cool and can add some positive effects if done right.

A popular aftermarket intake like the Weapon R boasts considerable HP gains but the logic behind the design does not make sense. A shorty intake 1) makes more noise at WOT, 2) does add some noticeable and quicker throttle response and 3) takes the engines air supply from under the hood. The 3rd item is where the problem lies with shorty intakes.

Under the hood resides the engine and radiator which when running produce a minimum of 190 degrees F of ambient temperature while the air temp outside the vehicle is on average 70 degrees (on a hot day)(your temperatures may vary). Because air becomes less dense as it's temperature increases there is less air to burn in the air fuel mixture. When this hotter (less dense) air is sensed by the Mass Air Sensor the computer schedules the fuel accordingly to maintain the proper Fuel Air ratio.

So less air = less fuel = less HP!

Studies of the IAT (inlet Air Temp sensor) on an Escape V6 reveal 70 to 130 degrees difference in temps on intake air outside the hood vs inside the hood. This can equate effectively to double the intake temp to the engine.

It is generally calculated that every 10 degree rise in intake temp equals 1% of loss in HP.

So lets say the difference is only 50 degs F = 5% = 0.05X200 HP in the stock escape =10 HP loss.

The intake companies claim you gain 5-7 HP. How is this possible?

Now Throttle response can improve a run time and be detectable in the "seat of your pants dyno", but the logic is not there and in real numbers it does not work out. If you've ever watch the auto shows and product demos they always run the tests with the hood up. Unless you drive around town with the hood up, you will not get the gains they speak of unless you go to a really CAI.

On My SC setup (which needs more air than a stock engine, but works under the same principle) I ran 3 1/2" ducting I bought off e-bay (it's two V6 mustang CAI kits that cost about $30 each) I cut the pipe to fit, used the clamps and hose connecters from the kit, and routed it though the hole in the fender well (where the resonator used to be) and into the left front fender, outside of the engines heat. I did have to cut the hole out a little larger to allow the 3 1/2 pipe to fit through. Then a K&N on the end. Throttle response is better and I maintain the cold air from outside the engine compartment.


 

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Looks pretty professional to me! Good job!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It does not really say where it gets the dense, cold air from and based on the amount of tubing I can't imagine it makes it out side the engine bay, but it might...

I have not seen that product before, I guess some folks are still trying to offer some aftermarket for the escape family... which is cool. :thumb:
 
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