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Does anyone know what size or bolt pattern the exhast flange is that is near the muffler. Approximately just in front of the rear wheels? I'm planning on unbolting the rear half of the exhaust...and putting on a 90 degree bend for a side exit "straight pipe" right in front of the rear wheel. But I want to use the bolts so when I have get my emissions done, I can quickly swap it back. Thanks!
 

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I've heard of people using a soup can and some metal clamps over a small hole to forego replacing exhaust pipe... If you use some sort of motorcycle exhaust tape to seal around a metal band with some clamps, I bet you could make that work... Introduce some flanging one end, tape and clamps, that might be your best option.

Does exhaust in front of a tire promote uneven wear on one of the tire, since it is constantly being pummeled with hot exhaust? We've got lots of "hicks" around here that mod out their early 90's ford F150's and Dodge Rams to that respect. Additionally, what about increased exhaust collecting on the rim? I've seen some ricers with a large exhaust can and the exhaust dust collects around the opening they had to cut in the bumper...
 

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I'm thinking that will sound horrible. You'll need some sort of muffler under there. You need some back pressure.
 

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SilverAthlon said:
I've heard of people using a soup can and some metal clamps over a small hole to forego replacing exhaust pipe... If you use some sort of motorcycle exhaust tape to seal around a metal band with some clamps, I bet you could make that work... Introduce some flanging one end, tape and clamps, that might be your best option.

Does exhaust in front of a tire promote uneven wear on one of the tire, since it is constantly being pummeled with hot exhaust? We've got lots of "hicks" around here that mod out their early 90's ford F150's and Dodge Rams to that respect. Additionally, what about increased exhaust collecting on the rim? I've seen some ricers with a large exhaust can and the exhaust dust collects around the opening they had to cut in the bumper...
A side exhaust can corrode aluminium wheels from the heat and moisture. Ford found that out in 1997 with their F-150s.
 

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You will feel a loss of torque w/o back pressure. It's not advised on an otherwise stock engine. Not only that, but any normally-aspirated V6, i4, and probably even V8s sound horrible w/o a muffler. I don't think your locals (nor law enforcement) will appreciate it either. Sorry to be brutally honest. At minimum, I would stick a small Magnaflow free-flowing muffler under there. Or, try it -- as post video clips. It would be neat to hear one w/o a muffler.

Yeah -- I remember the whole '97 F-150 thing.

Gibson has made these "Super Truck" systems -- which have always looked good. Of course they only make them for the big boys (full-sized trucks).

http://www.gibsonexhaust.com/truckandsuv/
 

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kkreit01 said:
You will feel a loss of torque w/o back pressure. It's not advised on an otherwise stock engine.
Not wanting to sound confrontational but can you be more specific.
Why would I feel less torque w/o back pressure to restrict the exhaust flow. If I put a 1 inch tail pipe on would I feel more torque?
 

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Too small of an exhaust chokes the engine and does not allow it to "breathe". Too large a diameter/free flowing and the vehicles computer cannot compensate with the correct air to fuel ratio, thus resulting in the engine "leaning out", reduced power. It can eventually kill the engine. This applies to off the lot vehicles, not race built as they are designed to run with little or no exhaust system.
 

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Plus I think the EGR system runs on backpressure, does it not?
 

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So by adding an aftermarket cat-back exhaust system from Gibson, Magnaflow or others will cause the computers to run the fuel management system lean and eventually kill the engine. In all the info for these aftermarket exhaust I don't see anything regarding remapping the computer. You'd think their testing of the systems would show this requiremnt and thus they'd pass that info along to prospective customers so they could achieve the full performance potential of the system vs damaging their engines due lean fuel conditions.

I thought the fuel control was from the MAF sensor with feedback from other sensors such as IAT, TPS, Coolant Temp Sensor, O2, etc.

Just trying to get a handle on things here. Are there any links to documented testing to support this?
 

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So by adding an aftermarket cat-back exhaust system from Gibson, Magnaflow or others will cause the computers to run the fuel management system lean and eventually kill the engine.
Only if you go ridiculously big to the point that there is more air than fuel. A typical aftermarket exhaust will be fine as long as it was designed for your specific vehicle. Going too big with a "custom system" is where you can run into trouble. Some people are still bent on the "bigger is better" theme. As long as you don't put 3" piping from the headers back, you'll be fine. The ready-made systems are perfectly fine.
 

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Those aftermarket exhausts shouldn't be a problem, the back-pressure issue is more with those who put 4" diesel truck exhausts onto a little Civic engine. I can hear them revving the heck out of those engines and yet I'm pulling away from them at 2500 RPM.
 

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You will be fine with any aftermarket cat back system designed for us. In your first post, it sounded like you were wanting to run a straight pipe out a side exit (in front of rear wheels)? This would be bad. A pipe after a muffler would be fine.
 

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i can tell you from experience...do not run a your escape with no muffler. you will lose power. i cut the muffler off of my 99 f150 in the process of saving up for a set of dual exhaust. it had the 4.3l v6 in it. and yes i lost power out of the truck. as soon as i had my flowmaster put on which was a 1 in 2 out muffler, my truck ran better than it did stock. you must have back pressure on a naturally aspirated engine or it is terrible on the valves and you will lose power. a high flow exhaust will lessen the back pressure from a factory setting, but still allows enough for the motor to run properly. a no muffler exhaust lessens the back pressure too much though. however if you are turbo or supercharged...the more open the exhaust is, the more power you will have. this type of setup relys on getting as much air as possible with a cai and getting rid of it as quick as possible through a high flow exhaust. on my grand prix gtp which was supercharged, i had to have this setup in order to run the smaller supercharger pulley. so i had a 3" exhaust which made a night and day difference over a factory exhaust w/ no cat.
 

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Pretty sure that's why you're supposed to disconnect the battery before you start an exhaust install.
 

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A general rule of thumb is this:
the more open you get, you gain top end horsepower, but can lose low end torque.
more towards the restricted side, you have the torque, but at the expense of horsepower.

The key is finding the best of both worlds and go with that. I would assume the vehicle-specific systems have this calculated.
And yeah, the first post sounded like something about taking the muffler off.
 

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Anyone using the word "backpressure" to explain how an exhaust works doesn't really know what they are talking about. :wall:
Stop presenting what you think you know as fact. :cuss:
If it persists I'll be calling out your posts individually.
 

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GFsEscape said:
Anyone using the word "backpressure" to explain how an exhaust works doesn't really know what they are talking about. :wall:
Stop presenting what you think you know as fact. :cuss:
If it persists I'll be calling out your posts individually.
I don't recall reviewing your application for moderating E-C. Maybe I misplaced it.

:shrug:

BTW, "exhaust back pressure" is a perfectly legitimate phrase.
 

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Squishy said:
Plus I think the EGR system runs on backpressure, does it not?
No, it does not. The system is run using combination of electric and vacuum actuation. Even without pressure in the exhaust, there is a vacuum in the intake manifold that would draw the exhaust gasses in (during light load only, not idle or heavy throttle) to pollute your intake air/fuel charge, which makes it burn cooler, which prevents cylinder temperatures above 2,500 degrees F, which prevents the production of NOx emissions (oxides of nitrogen). Like your PCV system, the EGR constantly puts crap into your intake which leaves deposits inside the manifold, on the valves, injectors, pistons, and combustion chambers.
 

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I'm guessing the original poster was looking to do something like this. I'll leave you to make your own judgement on it....personally I think it detracts from the car on a number of levels.


Plus it sounds exactly how you would expect an exhaust to sound if you remove the muffler.
 
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