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Looking at all the rust, is it possible the snap ring holding the OD Servo in rusted and failed? There should be an internal snap ring in that bore that holds it in. It looks like the slot is still there, but can't be certain.

I am not sure if any other damage was caused by the sudden loss of the fluid and it being driven, I don't know if you can get a new snap ring, put the OD Servo back in, fill it with fluid, and be good or not.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Looking at all the rust, is it possible the snap ring holding the OD Servo in rusted and failed? There should be an internal snap ring in that bore that holds it in. It looks like the slot is still there, but can't be certain.

I am not sure if any other damage was caused by the sudden loss of the fluid and it being driven, I don't know if you can get a new snap ring, put the OD Servo back in, fill it with fluid, and be good or not.
Thank you very much for the help, I didn't really know the name of the piece
 

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Servo piston rod pokes up into the transmission and the tip fits into a cup on the end of a band. When you put it back in, make sure the tip engages with the cup as the piston moves when pressure is behind the piston to grab the end of the band and make the band grip the drum it surrounds. There should be a cover that is held in place by a snap ring. Given the rust shown on the cooler lines(if they leak, you will lose all fluid from the trans... mebbe do some preventive replacement at least of sections), it is a likely possibility the snap ring rusted away and allow the parts to pop out.
Look on the 'automatic transmission' channel on YT, and check the vids on the CD4E. Hiram Gutierrez should show the disassembly of the servo and all the parts in one of the first few videos. Later vids should show how to put it back.
tom
 

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I agree with Tom's comment about looking at Hiram's channel for showing in detail how the servo works. It seems you lost the snap ring, as others have suggested to rusting away.

With that said, your transmission pump and the return line are both considerably rusty. I'd concern yourself with cleaning the rust off and protecting those parts. I've recently had my pump rust through and fail. I ended rebuilding the whole transmission to rectify my issues with rust.
 

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Servo piston rod pokes up into the transmission and the tip fits into a cup on the end of a band. When you put it back in, make sure the tip engages with the cup as the piston moves when pressure is behind the piston to grab the end of the band and make the band grip the drum it surrounds. There should be a cover that is held in place by a snap ring. Given the rust shown on the cooler lines(if they leak, you will lose all fluid from the trans... mebbe do some preventive replacement at least of sections), it is a likely possibility the snap ring rusted away and allow the parts to pop out.
Look on the 'automatic transmission' channel on YT, and check the vids on the CD4E. Hiram Gutierrez should show the disassembly of the servo and all the parts in one of the first few videos. Later vids should show how to put it back.
tom
Thanks, Tom, and O.P.!
This might be very helpful for me!
I have an '08 V6 FWD that runs good/good mileage, but leaks ATF badly! 260k miles, much of it in salty winters!

I feel like this work might be slightly beyond my 'comfort zone' (partly based on my skill set, mostly based on weather!)
Any advice in being a little more confident in this 'diagnosis'?
Last time I got it topped up with ATF (at a place just 1 mile from my house.), at least 1 quart leaked out on my driveway over the weekend (I have 2 of these, so have been driving the other one...)...right under the driverside footwell...

Any recommendations on how to ask for this repair work without having the mechanic thinking I am a @hole?

Thanks! Either way!
 

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Either crawl under, and look after removing the shield, or take it to a shop. If the complaint is just leaks, it may be something a general mechanic can handle without the need for specialists such as transmission shops.
Leaks can be loose cooler line fittings, corroded cooler lines with pinhole leaks, the 'pan' gasket on the front side, or cv axle seals just to name common causes. Also the drain plug, often not even thought of.
Pinholed cooler lines can be patched effectively by removing the damaged line(tubing cutter recommended), flaring the ends, and fitting high pressure or oil resistant line over the flares and clamping in place. Back when, servicing automatic transmissions called for removal, and accessing the fittings was cumbersome. The lines would be cut, and good quality fuel line used to join the lines upon re-installation. Convenience and speed, and they were pretty reliable methods.
Most leak sources are listed above, AFAIK. Also take a look at the cooler as it can be damaged by rough handling or by road debris. The cooler line fittings should be disconnected by use of the 'spring tool' rather than unscrewing them as that will (can) damaged the internal seals.
tom
 

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Here is my old CD4E's pump and you can see it blew a hole in it from rust. Most of the casing is aluminum, so the areas you need to check are the cooler line (you can see mine is replaced a while ago with a hose) and the pump:

Automotive tire Plant Gas Wood Artifact


These are the absolute weak points of the CD4E, good luck and hopefully it's not your pump.
 

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A big slug of RTV, let it cure, and you're done... not.
I do not live where salt is fed to the roadside vegetation. That is a surprising amount of corrosion given that the metal of the pump is at least 1/8" thick. Pretty good sized holes, too.
It looks as if you have dropped the trans at least somewhat. If you do not disturb the band, you may be able to replace the outer without having to remove further or do further disassembly. I would take a look at the shaft used to drive the pump, examining the splines to see if there is significant wear, and if worn, replace the shaft. I am not sure which end gets worn and quits spinning the pump gizzards, but it is apparently a second weak point.
good luck getting things back together
tom

zero_cool
Guess you already have it back together. Just went back and re-read the comment.
Did you go through the whole thing, or just the needed bits?
tom
 
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