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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I own a 2005 ford escape xlt which has awd and a v6 engine. I have been talking to some sales people who sell escapes and we got talking about fuel economy. From what a couple people say they think i am getting horrible gas mileage. I would like your opinion as to what you get in mpg or l/100km in the city and how far you can go on a tank of gas. Here is my driving details:

-driven 95% in the city in low-mid heavy traffic.
-I rarely go above 2500rpm and barely go above 3000rpm while accelerating to go on the hwy.
-I drive on average around 30-40km from mon to fri and about 30-45km on weekends.
-I dont let my car idle for long periods and dont spend a whole lot of time at stop lights on my route to work.
-Everything on my car is from the factory, i have no modifications
-My car is regularly maintained very close to the manufactures recommended service.
-My tires are properly inflated at the ford recommended PSI rating.


As of during September i was getting 300km out of a tank of gas (60L). I have taken it in to my private mechanic to see if he can find anything wrong and he couldn't find anything. He recommended pulling the fuse for the 4x4 and i got 378km out of that tank of gas when the 4x4 was not on. and now i have put the fuse back in to see what i can get out of this tank of gas so im comparing gas mileage at the same time of year.

PLEASE HELP ME, im a student need to get every km out of my gas i can lol!

Thanks in advance for any help.
 

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that ressemble to what i got on my 2010 awd and i have the six speed trans as well as the new 3.0 liter 240 hp. So when i get 325 km out of a 60l tank, i'm considering myself lucky. Engine has now 12000 km so i dont expect my fuel economy to go any better.
it's about 18.5 l/100 km combined.

I'm far of the 11,6l/100km city stated on the windows sticker of my truck

I found that a little high but it's a v-6 awd truck so...

I got near 400km on a tank one time because of long trip on highway.

hope this help a little.
 

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For city driving, I think you're getting about ballpark mileage.

I have the same vehicle. 2005 V6 AWD. I'm getting about the same mileage.

Make sure you're not carrying any extra weight (cargo).

BTW, the AWD is not full time. The AWD AFAIK is mainly FWD and the rear tires only engage when the system senses a loss of traction. I'm not sure what (if any) long term effects would be on the drive system if you pull the fuse that engages the AWD.
 

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Thats pretty much average MPG for city driving...i get on avg 16-18, LOTS of stop signs/lights here, i go thru at least 7 on my commute. I get about 20 on the HWY. Some mechanic told me once that some escapes are just more efficient than others and some, not so much.
 

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A no-cost "fix/improvement" is tire pressure. Up your tire pressure to decrease rolling resistance. The type of tires you utilize can also contribute to fuel mileage or lack of adequate mileage.
 

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Four_Eyes said:
For city driving, I think you're getting about ballpark mileage.

I have the same vehicle. 2005 V6 AWD. I'm getting about the same mileage.

Make sure you're not carrying any extra weight (cargo).

BTW, the AWD is not full time. The AWD AFAIK is mainly FWD and the rear tires only engage when the system senses a loss of traction. I'm not sure what (if any) long term effects would be on the drive system if you pull the fuse that engages the AWD.
It's more than full time than anything else. Everytime you leave from a dead stop, you get rear wheel torque and it slowly drops till you reach a constant speed. Moderate acceleration from a constant speed generates rear wheel torque again.

I'm using a properly coded Scangage-II to monitor rear wheel torque. I have yet to see any "increased" rear wheel torque on snow, rain, etc. If your going to spin your tires, it's going to be mostly while leaving from a dead stop or accelerating from a constant speed during which your getting rear wheel torque anyway.

You like myself included were fooled by all this AWD hype in the brochures and/or sales people.
 

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To me, also, that city consumption does not seem illogical for this specific vehicle.
16l/100km is the best I get in city driving with my 2004 V6 AWD.
What I have found:There are immence differences in consumption with these cars, or at least mine.
Ranges with mine which is lifted 2" and steps on 205/80/16 Mud Terrain and with the AC off:
1/City 100km drive with two people................................320km
2/Highway with just me and 50kg load driving flat-out........245km
3/Same as 2/ but with the cruise control set at 96km/h......540km!!!
4/Off-road driving,2 people, flat-out, 3000 revs and above..200km
Gasoline used 95octane, (91 in USA).

Driving in the city for long periods one has to consider, among other things, the times the radiator fan kicks in and how much energy is needed for it to operate.It is a lot!
 

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wptski said:
Four_Eyes said:
For city driving, I think you're getting about ballpark mileage.

I have the same vehicle. 2005 V6 AWD. I'm getting about the same mileage.

Make sure you're not carrying any extra weight (cargo).

BTW, the AWD is not full time. The AWD AFAIK is mainly FWD and the rear tires only engage when the system senses a loss of traction. I'm not sure what (if any) long term effects would be on the drive system if you pull the fuse that engages the AWD.
It's more than full time than anything else. Everytime you leave from a dead stop, you get rear wheel torque and it slowly drops till you reach a constant speed. Moderate acceleration from a constant speed generates rear wheel torque again.

I'm using a properly coded Scangage-II to monitor rear wheel torque. I have yet to see any "increased" rear wheel torque on snow, rain, etc. If your going to spin your tires, it's going to be mostly while leaving from a dead stop or accelerating from a constant speed during which your getting rear wheel torque anyway.

You like myself included were fooled by all this AWD hype in the brochures and/or sales people.
Well that's good to know. For me anyways. I prefer a full-time AWD than a part time system. No rhyme or reason why...Just a personal preference.
 

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Four_Eyes said:
wptski said:
Four_Eyes said:
For city driving, I think you're getting about ballpark mileage.

I have the same vehicle. 2005 V6 AWD. I'm getting about the same mileage.

Make sure you're not carrying any extra weight (cargo).

BTW, the AWD is not full time. The AWD AFAIK is mainly FWD and the rear tires only engage when the system senses a loss of traction. I'm not sure what (if any) long term effects would be on the drive system if you pull the fuse that engages the AWD.
It's more than full time than anything else. Everytime you leave from a dead stop, you get rear wheel torque and it slowly drops till you reach a constant speed. Moderate acceleration from a constant speed generates rear wheel torque again.

I'm using a properly coded Scangage-II to monitor rear wheel torque. I have yet to see any "increased" rear wheel torque on snow, rain, etc. If your going to spin your tires, it's going to be mostly while leaving from a dead stop or accelerating from a constant speed during which your getting rear wheel torque anyway.

You like myself included were fooled by all this AWD hype in the brochures and/or sales people.
Well that's good to know. For me anyways. I prefer a full-time AWD than a part time system. No rhyme or reason why...Just a personal preference.
You can pull the fuse marked for the 4WD "only" and pickup a few MPGs but the dash wrench will stay ON.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks everyone for your help! At least i know im not alone as i was starting to get confused as to what i should be expecting. I guess i just have to bight the bullet which i dont mind as for most people who enjoy cars its also our hobbies so i dont mind putting a bit more $ into every day driving. And id rather be stuck with the gas milage of an escape comaired to any full size suv lol. Another family member of mine has a 2010 xlt v6 with awd and it sounds like the new 6 speed transmission puts the older escape's 4 speed to shame. Other wise i love my escape to death....i will only have to wait untill im done school to buy my self a new escape!
 

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Billyk said:
A no-cost "fix/improvement" is tire pressure. Up your tire pressure to decrease rolling resistance. The type of tires you utilize can also contribute to fuel mileage or lack of adequate mileage.
Pretty much all you can do right now since you have it properly tuned and running correctly. 30psi is the OE recommended, bump it up to 33 and see how you like the handling.
You might get one more MPG.
 

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Four_Eyes said:
wptski said:
Four_Eyes said:
For city driving, I think you're getting about ballpark mileage.

I have the same vehicle. 2005 V6 AWD. I'm getting about the same mileage.

Make sure you're not carrying any extra weight (cargo).

BTW, the AWD is not full time. The AWD AFAIK is mainly FWD and the rear tires only engage when the system senses a loss of traction. I'm not sure what (if any) long term effects would be on the drive system if you pull the fuse that engages the AWD.
It's more than full time than anything else. Everytime you leave from a dead stop, you get rear wheel torque and it slowly drops till you reach a constant speed. Moderate acceleration from a constant speed generates rear wheel torque again.

I'm using a properly coded Scangage-II to monitor rear wheel torque. I have yet to see any "increased" rear wheel torque on snow, rain, etc. If your going to spin your tires, it's going to be mostly while leaving from a dead stop or accelerating from a constant speed during which your getting rear wheel torque anyway.

You like myself included were fooled by all this AWD hype in the brochures and/or sales people.
Well that's good to know. For me anyways. I prefer a full-time AWD than a part time system. No rhyme or reason why...Just a personal preference.
On my part, i think that intelligent awd like escape have is better than "full time " system like subaru gets. You always have the awd on at all time and that'S why Subaru's are gaz guzzler like they are. Not mentioning that it's more dangerous on curves when road is icing as you can go sliding easily if your not taking caution. The escape will sense slippery and engage the anti-slippage program if it occurs. AWD will be on 4x4 mode only when needed. What is the benefit to have real tine awd if you are on dry pavement?
 

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gbrown69 said:
What is the benefit to have real tine awd if you are on dry pavement?
None. It's just a personal preference. Though there's no reason for me to dislike part-time AWD, I'm just not a subscriber of sometimes on, sometimes off system. Maybe it goes back to my days of (heaven forbid) manual locking hubs.
 

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Four_Eyes said:
gbrown69 said:
What is the benefit to have real tine awd if you are on dry pavement?
None. It's just a personal preference. Though there's no reason for me to dislike part-time AWD, I'm just not a subscriber of sometimes on, sometimes off system. Maybe it goes back to my days of (heaven forbid) manual locking hubs.
oh yeah , i remember that.... hehe go out, lock them and yahooo.... into the mud please...

know what you mean!

That'S when no onboard computer were in cars.... times have change so much since then...
 
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