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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been noticing this more frequently when my 2010 Escape is cold. Seems to go away a few minutes down the road. I had the garage check it and they confirmed that it had been "flashed" for that issue. The mechanic was a bit surprised when he felt the shift since their computer detected that it had already been flashed. Is there a way to adjust the transmission again for this issue? Sometimes I don't really trust the mechanics here in our area. I'm driving out next summer and, with my extended service plan, may have a more reputable garage check into it. What I do now is, when I know it's going to shift, I let off the accelerator a bit to ease into the shift.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Just noticed the other day the shift from 2-3 is hanging a bit. From what I've read, this is what many have experienced. I was at a Ford dealership the other day when out on business and asked them about the issues I've been having and they said there may be some new "flashes" to address these issues. I'm not sure if our garage here is aware of them.

I wonder if this is worth a try:

http://www.ebay.com/gds/How-to-Reprogra ... 735/g.html

Also, does this youtube video present the proper way to clear the PCM on my 2010 Ford Escape?

 

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If I have a shift problem I try a flush first, many times it makes a remarkable difference. I have heard that you can clear the memory so that the vehicle relearns several things including shifting.
 

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I have not been inside a 6F35, (not that I'd fit) but most automatic transmissions use clutches (clutch packs that have frictions and steels packaged side-by-side) for direct or 3rd gear operation. The clutch pack engage by hydraulic pressure on a 'piston' (looks like a washer with a large hole in the middle, seals inner and outer edges) that is pushed against springs to squish the frictions and steels together to transfer power. The seals on the piston get hardened with heat and age, and start to leak fluid under pressure, and allow the clutch to 'slip', generating more heat cooking the seals even more... and soon $$$'s learn to fly.
That said, if the clutch for 3rd are slipping, then they are wearing. They are generating heat, and they are slowly cooking the fluid and the transmission. They will not 'self heal' and they won't get better with age or use.
If the unit is under warranty, try taking a spin in a comparable model, to compare shift quality. If yours is bad, get the service writer to take a ride in your vehicle, demonstrate the shift characteristics, the climb into the other vehicle and take the same ride. Denial is more than a river in Egypt. Do not let them deny what is apparent, and if it is truly a slipping transmission, get them to fix it.
Some designs allow slippery clutch apply. So you don't 'feel' the shift. I do not drive those vehicles as I know that slips and slides == heat, and heat is what damages things that are literally bathed in lubricant, such as transmission gizzards. ATF is ALL OVER THE PLACE, flying around under pressure, leaking past seals and valve body pieces, so lube is there. Some parts are shielded from the flow, and some are loaded to they demand 'tubes' to direct flow to keep the cool under load (rear bearings in AXOD), but there IS lube all over.
Most transmissions die from being overheated, and in some cases, part of that is by design. If your bits slip, they ARE heating. The clutch disk in your 5-speed pickup truck gets over 100F within seconds of you backing out of the driveway. Just that little bit of slippage can make it too hot to touch. See also brake shoes, pads, drums and disks. Friction. From things 'sliding' on one another == heat. Period.
tom
 

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And of course, make sure your fluid is at the correct level. If your doing a flush that's the perfect time to check the level. Bit of a pain to properly check the level in my 2013 6F35. No dip stick, but a whole song-and-dance procedure you have to go through just to check the level.
 

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Doing the flush is best done by yourself so you know what fluid is used and not chancing getting the wrong fluid from a shop that works with 10 different tranny fluids in a day so that you arent sure whats left in the machine when they flush your tranny.
Its a pretty simple procedure, same as a power steering flush, you remove 1 hose and keep adding fluid with the engine running until it comes out clean like the new fluid you are adding. It may take 1/2 hour to do, thats getting stuff ready, flushing and cleaning up. Theres several videos about it, no special tools and not too messy.
If it turns out theres a problem internally, then Tom is right, there isnt much you can do except start saving for a tranny or another vehicle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I have a feeling that I may have solved the issue I've posted in this thread. I've found a crack around one of the exhaust pipes where it exits one of the mufflers. I applied JB Weld to it today and it seems to have actually solved the shifting issue that I have posted here. Is it actually possible that an exhaust leak could mess with the computer and shift points?
 

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csonni said:
I have a feeling that I may have solved the issue I've posted in this thread. I've found a crack around one of the exhaust pipes where it exits one of the mufflers. I applied JB Weld to it today and it seems to have actually solved the shifting issue that I have posted here. Is it actually possible that an exhaust leak could mess with the computer and shift points?
Can't think how. You thought the shift issue was resolved in 2016 with the PCM relearning - did the issue come back quickly?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Yes, it returned rather quickly. After more extensive driving today, I'm convinced the issue with the shift into 3rd is gone. It must've had something to do with decreased back pressure, That's all I can think of.
 

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csonni said:
Hmmm what? That thread is about a different (& diesel motor). Looks like it might have been wiring disturbed during his exhaust work, not an issue with the exhaust flow.

The Tribute/Escape 3.0 will likely have its torque output moderated while shifting, normally gas engines do that by retarding the ignition during the shift - I've changed the entire exhaust system for a straight-through and back again with no effect on shift quality so I really don't think it was a problem but if it was the disconnecting the battery for several minutes would force a re-learn by the engine and trans ECU's.
 

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Perhaps back pressure and thus EGR flow was diddled with when the leak was repaired. The DPFE senses pressure in the exhaust to fiddle with the EGR setting(and how much is flowed). If the back pressure produced is lower(leaky), it may sense the engine is under less load, and thus can handle more EGR flow. As a guess. That would make the engine run differently from one that had proper back pressure.
Ask a FoMoCo emissions engineer what the effect would be having one side of the engine with proper back pressure, and the other with less...
tom
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
So, after all this time, I believe I did get to the source of the hard shift. Strange, but it's all in how hard (or light) I am accelerating. Accelerating lightly will most always bring on that strange shift into 3rd gear. More aggressive acceleration will always eliminate any such shift. Just thought I'd update on that. After testing for the last several months, it's all in the acceleration.
 
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