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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Longtime lurker..... Love this place. I seem to be having a little issue. I just installed a 35watt 5000K kit with optional Wiring Harness and the lighting pattern seems very uneven on the ground with some areas being much lighter and some being a little darker. I get the feeling that this is because it is not a projector HID. Can anyone verify this? Is there an easy fix?

I am a little underwhelmed by the amount of light that these produce. I think I may be a little happier with more light. Has anyone had issues with reflector melting with 55watt kits?
 

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Those are called "Hotspots" and occur when you use HIDs in non projector halogen housings. You can't fix it unless you retrofit proper HID projectors. Also you should adjust your headligts down a slight but due to glare (no matter what it happens - that's why we don't have a nice clean cutoff)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
This is the first I have heard of the hotspots but it makes sense. I still have to adjust the aim a bit. Thanks for the response. :beer:
 

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viewtopic.php?f=11&t=5173&p=99600&hilit=stern#p99600

GatorJ said:
The HID modification is illegal in most, if not all, states and with good reason. If the reflector and lense of the housing are designed for halogen bulbs, installing a HID bulb can have several unintended and negative consequences. Glare to oncoming drivers is only one of those consequences, but it is a particularly annoying and dangerous one.

I recommend you go to Daniel Stern's website and read everything you can before you spend your money. Stern is a well known automotive lighting engineer/expert. This is what he has to say about the HID conversion:

"Thinking of converting to HID?

So you've read about HID headlamps and have it in mind to convert your car. A few mouse clicks on the web, and you've found a couple of outfits offering to sell you a "conversion" that will fit any car with a given type of halogen bulb. STOP! Put away that credit card.

An "HID kit" consists of HID ballasts and bulbs for retrofitting into a halogen headlamp. Kits for replacement of standard round or rectangular sealed-beam headlamps usually include a poor-quality replaceable-bulb headlight lens-reflector unit that's not safe or legal even when equipped with the intended (usually H4) halogen bulb. Often, these products are advertised using the name of a reputable lighting company ("Real Philips kit! Real Osram kit! Real Hella kit!") to try to give the potential buyer the illusion of legitimacy. On rare occasion, some of the components in these kits did start out as legitimate HID headlight bulbs made by reputable companies, but they are modified (hacked) by the "HID kit" suppliers, and they aren't being put to their designed or intended use. Reputable companies like Philips, Osram, Hella, etc. never endorse this kind of hacked usage of their products. Nevertheless, it's easy to get "HID kits" from China bearing the (unauthorised, counterfeit) brands of major, reputable companies. See this page for just a few examples of the many packaging options offered by just one Chinese maker of "HID kits".

Halogen headlamps and HID headlamps require very different optics to produce a safe and effective-not to mention legal-beam pattern. How come? Because of the very different characteristics of the two kinds of light source.

A halogen bulb has a cylindrical light source: the glowing filament. The space immediately surrounding the cylinder of light is completely dark, and so the sharpest contrast between bright and dark is along the edges of the cylinder of light. The ends of the filament cylinder fade from bright to dark. An HID bulb, on the other hand, has a crescent-shaped light source -- the arc. It's crescent-shaped because as it passes through the space between the two electrodes, its heat causes it to try to rise. The space immediately surrounding the crescent of light glows in layers...the closer to the crescent of light, the brighter the glow. The ends of the arc crescent are the brightest points, and immediately beyond these points is completely dark, so the sharpest contrast between bright and dark is at the ends of the crescent of light.

This diagram shows the very different characteristics of the filament vs. the arc:

When designing the optics (lens and/or reflector) for a lamp, the characteristics of the light source are the driving factor around which everything else must be engineered. If you go and change the light source, you've done the equivalent of putting on somebody else's eyeglasses: You can probably make them fit on your face OK, but you won't see properly."

http://www.danielsternlighting.com/tech/bulbs/Hid/conversions/conversions.html
 

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I installed them in my 09 and no problems with the pattern. I have 35 watt 6000k and super bright. Maybe it's the kit u bought?



 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
If you look at your second pic, you can see the hotspots and darker spots. ;)
 

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nothing wron i used a cheap camera
 

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^ It's not the camera it's the hotspots. Nothing wrong with the lights but this will happen with every halogen reflector housing with an HID bulb in there.

If you drive a car with really good OEM HIDs now since you're used to your car you will see the difference in cut off and light distrubution (honda S2000s have good projectors).

Don't worry my car has hotspots too.

Also see in your first pic the bit of light scattered up on the garage door? That would never happen with an OEM projector/HID setup. There would be zero light above the cutoff line.
 

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Update:

I recently began a small project at the track, and talking to other drivers, i noticed that most the teams have HIDs in their cars. Therefore i believe that what i posted before can't be entirely accurate, otherwise the teams driving at night wouldnt be putting them on their cars.

PS. I used HIDs on a Subaru impreza with projector headlights, and didnt found real improvement. I Don't know if the reflector headlight (most of the cars at the track had those) would make it better.
Im considering seriously putting Hids on my E due to the findings at the track.
:beer:
 
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