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For the charger plug you are trying to hard wire, use a standard ground and look for a RED/BLUE that goes up to the steering column for constant +12 volts or BLACK/GREEN (same location) wire if you want +12 volts to be switched with the key. Be sure to use an inline fuse 2 amps should be about right. As for the LEDs, run a fused wire to the RED/BLUE wire for +12 and run the ground wire from the LEDs to the LIGHT GREEN/ORANGE wire on the GEM module located under the center console to the right of the gas pedal (BEHIND THE CENTER CONSOLE ON FLOOR. REMOVE BLACK PANEL RIGHT OF GAS PEDAL, PULL UP CARPET. PLUG FACES DRIVER SIDE.) This will turn the LEDs on when you open the door by switching the ground instead of +12 volts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks :)

I have a tried a few variations of this but you have to remember you are speaking to an idiot :shades:

Unfortunately I do not understand the "RED/BLUE" that runs up to the steering column (I think tomorrow when I go look at everything again, I'll be able to recognize it). I do not know what a "fused wire" is either (although I think I have a pretty good idea, not 100% sure). Same with inline fuse........

As far as the LED's, I was using the panel by the door, not the GEM module. I will try that tomorrow when it's light out :)

I know this isn't rocket science, so hopefully I can get it going (just may take me a bit longer than others). Thanks for the help!
 

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The RED/BLUE wire is a red wire with a blue stripe. If you can, go to a parts store and get you a cheap volt meter (multi meter) so that you can verify wire polarity before hooking anything up--DO NOT USE A TEST LIGHT!! An inline sure or fused wire is just a fuse holder with a fuse. ALWAYS be sure to put the fuse as close as possible to where you tie into voltage.
 

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Exactly. Test lights can destroy some of the low-current circuits that started appearing in cars in the 1990s.

Look for a "high impedance" digital multimeter. I picked one up at Lowe's for $15.
 

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jpark said:
Exactly. Test lights can destroy some of the low-current circuits that started appearing in cars in the 1990s.

Look for a "high impedance" digital multimeter. I picked one up at Lowe's for $15.
I think I bought the same one!
 
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