Ford Escape Automobiles Forum banner
1 - 2 of 2 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
951 Posts
I had a significant leak on my 3.0L V6. It was so bad there I could not identify where it was leaking from. The entire bottom and front side of the engine was covered in oil. It looked like a shootout from a Quentin Tarrantino movie... As the exhaust got hot it would smoke from under the hood. Again, significant leak.

Since it's an 05 with some rot issues and a dead 4WD transfer case, I mostly ignored it until I could replace the truck and junk it.

Many months later, it threw an oil pressure light. The oil pressure sensor switches are known to cause this so I ordered one and installed it because it was cheap and easy to do. Guess what? The switch was also leaking oil. Now there's no oil leaks. Like none. Zip.

That pressure sensor switch was leaking and since it's behind the AC compressor, it hid itself well. The oil made its way to the belt and slung itself over the entire bottom and front of the engine.

Even though the switch requires the AC compressor to be removed, it's only a 30 minute job because the AC is on the front side of the motor right under the front bumper. I don't have a lift so I used wheel ramps for better clearance. Just three bolts and swing the compressor out of the way - you don't need to disconnect any refrigerant lines. Change the switch with a deep socket and reassemble.

John

EDIT: remember, all motors with high miles or a lot of age leak some. Substantial can mean anything. To me, that's a two inch puddle any time it's parked. To others, that could any seeping that visible on the engine. Is it leaving a drop, two drops, or a small puddle?

Any oil that leaves a drop or two or more should be investigated, but on an older engine you generally see some seepage from the timing cover, oil pan, front crank seal, etc, but only seepage, not dripping. If you're just seeing some dampness and no puddles, I'd be inclined to ignore it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
951 Posts
haha love the tarantino reference!
Thanks. It's so hard being an internet comedian these days and the pay really stinks.

This was the amount of oil leaking overnight. Not sure why it's in a few places and seems like a lot to me, but am not sure.
Yep, that's enough to be concerned about. As for why the large area, it's simply because any oil leak a bit higher on the engine tends to work in several directions towards the ground, and then you have the radiator fans blowing on it which also moves it around. In my case, the entire bottom third of the engine was soaked in oil and I could not find out where it was because there was fresh oil everywhere. I stumbled across it when I changed the oil pressure sensor switch because it was illuminating the red (and ominous looking) oil pressure light. Once I corrected that, the oil leak disappeared completely. The strange thing is that even as I changed it, it didn't seem to be the cause of the leak.

Getting back to that cardboard, you also can't completely trust that the biggest spot is directly under the leak although that would be nice. I had a car once that seemed to be leaking from the transmission when it had a valve cover leak on the other side of the motor.

As Mountain Escape suggested, verifying what exactly is leaking is also important. For all we know, that could be power steering fluid.

An oil switch as the source would be great (as mine was) because it's quick and easy. Valve covers aren't bad either but take more time. Other things like crank shaft seals or timing cover gaskets require much more work and cost, but you don't want to commit to those repairs until you know for a fact they're the source of the leak. Imagine spending $1700 and finding it still leaking?

John
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
Top