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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
my 01 escape rattles from the sub any ideas on where the rattles are coming from and how to fix it i think some are from somewhere on the door just dont know what to do
 

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This vehicle rattles, just solve it with proper deadening. Kkreit01 has handily beat me to it.

Also the stock sub sucks.
 

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This might be a stretch, but on 2007 and older E/M/Ts, look at the liftgate license plate. Ford (finally) made four license plate screws standard on 2008 and newer models, but older models leave the lower part of the license plate unsecured, and it will usually rattle with a sub.
 

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jpark said:
This might be a stretch, but on 2007 and older E/M/Ts, look at the liftgate license plate. Ford (finally) made four license plate screws standard on 2008 and newer models, but older models leave the lower part of the license plate unsecured, and it will usually rattle with a sub.
Not my 2008. I just have 2.
 

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dust4 said:
thanks for all the replies. for now just a stock sub...which sucks. but i have a jvc KD-AVX2 deck, hopefully a new sub soon where should i put it. thinking maybe on the floor in the middle of the back seat? yay?nay? dont realy know.

..check out my other post...its better 0 replies tho

http://www.escape-city.com/viewtopic.php?f=11&t=4114&p=76624#p76624
Nay.

Check my builds out, you've got much better options. This is my world, I can definitely help you with good quality audio in these cars if you are serious about it.
 

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dust4 said:
im serious about making it sound better. i am on a bit of a budget. but let me know what u are thinking about im very interested.
A solid system in this vehicle begins with a decision. Do you keep the stock deck, or do you change it out? That then sets the path for the rest of the system.

The next piece to figure out is, how much space if any are you willing to sacrifice. If the answer is "none", you can still do it, but you need to study up on building a false floor. You also need to start hunting down quality shallow-mount subwoofers.

The next part is deadening, or more correctly damping. A three-tiered approach as I mentioned above produces the biggest bang for the buck.

From here, you have another fork in the road. You can go active or passive with your arrangement of speakers. Active means you will be actively controlling the signal of each individual speaker so tweeters and woofers and subs get the right frequencies sent to them. You must have one amplifier channel available per speaker, so a woofer and tweeter do not share a channel like a passive setup. This also involves the use of a processor, or a smart head unit to handle crossover frequencies. There's more to active stuff than this but I'll keep it simple for now. Passive means that you are using the little crossover boxes that come with some speakers, or you are using cheap coaxial speakers they will have tiny passive parts built in. I obviously recommend going active. It costs more, but the payoff is that you can use just about any speaker you want (including individual drivers from the home audio side, which are cheaper!) Going active also means you typically get control of Time Alignment, (T/A). More on this in a bit...

Another decision to make will be if you go coaxials, or components for the front. I highly recommend components but coaxials can work if they are high quality. Coaxial means the tweeter and woofer are basically together. Components often offer much higher performance (there are exceptions in the coaxial crowd), but because the woofer and tweeter are in separate locations one must consider the consequences of pathlength differences between the woofer and your ear, and the tweeter and your ear. Then there is the collective difference between left and right speakers relative to your ear as well. This is where time alignment comes into play.

without making high sound quality difficult, here are the basics with ANY audio system, in a car, home, or even pro audio:

1. Either minimize reflections, or use them to your advantage. We can cover reflections in depth, but be prepared for some math and some geometry. Audio waves like anything else simply reflect off some things, and absorb off others, and a variety of things in between. Using a reflection to your advantage for instance would be like using your windshield to bounce sound from the tweeter at the dash level to your ears.

2. Minimize path length differences as much as possible, OR compensate for them electronically with time-alignment. If a speaker is closer to you on the left vs. the right, your brain's perception is that the louder closer speaker is more important and your attention draws to that speaker. You can't get a 3D acoustic "image" from just one speaker. With T/A, you can delay each speaker so the arrival time of a closer speaker's sound comes right in time with a farther one. Sound travels at the speed of...sound... so again its simple math and sometimes processors do the math for you in feet or inches. With regard to woofers and tweeters separated, if the pathlengths are different there, the coherence of the image gets smeared and ragged. Timing each speaker here matters a lot. This is why I push for active control.

3. Minimize resonances or rattling, because rattles create harmonics that detract from the acoustic image. If a bass note causes a higher frequency squeak in the back, your attention is drawn to the annoying squeak, even though bass notes are not localizeable by the human brain normally (the wave is too long.) The higher frequency harmonics or really you can call it distortion from a rattle or squeak absolutely KILL the effect of a good sounding car. Deadening has been covered well by me and by others here on the forum, just follow the 3 step rule I mentioned and you'll be in great shape here.

4. Keep the back wave of a speaker from the front wave, especially with long-wave speakers like subs and mid-woofers. Whenever a wave hits another wave it either adds or subtracts (remember physics?) Well the best way to kill the bass output of a speaker is to not pay attention to how the front and back of the speaker interact. This is why when we build a subwoofer, we put it in some box. And of course some boxes are tuned with a port to actually inverse the rear wave to be in time with the front wave, which makes a ported box. Not to overcomplicate it, I just want to say anytime you work on things like your door speakers (woofers), pay attention to how the door is sealed up. You don't want the rear wave of the speaker to contact the front wave. You also want to gasket off the speaker from the door skin itself so the sound actually gets to your interior instead of the door panel's interior.

5. Crossovers. Each speaker made has a certain range of frequencies it can play without significant distortion due to its design. Tweeters don't move enough to play bass frequencies, and subwoofers are too heavy to play high frequencies...and woofers that are asked to play too high create distortion in the form of "breakup" which sounds like harshness or spotty sound depending on the frequency. The solution is to use crossovers. Active crossovers do it electronically, and passive crossovers also do it electronically, but with coils, resistors, inductors, capacitors, all in the path of the speaker line. Active gives control and adjustment, and is done before amplification of the signal so there is less wasted energy, and passive is not nearly as adjustable, and in the path of the signal so it wastes more energy.

6. Clarity. you don't have to spend a ton to get quality, but you also can't expect flea-market brands to give you something special. Most of detail and clarity is in the tuning and the fore-mentioned items above, but generally speaking you want to limit distortion and clipping issues by running gear that will do the job right, and with finesse. Woofers and tweeters matter the most, then head unit / processor, then amp...in my opinion of course. Wiring is dead last, and install itself is absolutely first, but that's pretty obvious.

7. Power. Wattage is logarithmic relative to sound volume (SPL.) It takes 10x the amount of power to get twice as much volume. Music is dynamic, so if you play a passage of music through an amp at near full power, any high dynamics like cymbal crash or bass thumps will reach a maximum beyond what the amp can do...which will clip the signal (flat-line the wave.) Overall, NOT good, and it is what you hear when you hear massive distortion in the sound. I can go into more detail on this later, but for now just remember that a clean signal and loud music requires power. And with the reduction in frequency, you need more and more power to maintain the same volume. That's why sub amps are so damn powerful, or at least they should be.

Well, that was fun. What is your budget for your whole system? And are you willing to build your system in phases with a budget for each phase? Or is the total number more important. Keep in mind that $700-1000++ is about where things can actually turn out pretty good. Below that there just isn't enough money to get quality goods. My current system would cost me about $2500, but also has navigation, DVD video, and some pretty good gear onboard. It also mostly came from other installs I've put together over the years. Audio gear doesn't really wear out or die too often, so consider it more of an investment like jewelry or a nice coat rather than an expense like gas or food.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Wow. thanks for the very in depth approach. Maybe a little bit to technical for me even tho you spelled it out as much as you can. i appreciate it very much and honestly think i should just wait until i do have a bit more money. i have a jvc kd ax2 deck in. maybe ill just stop the rattling for now. cause i think what mim looking for is gonna cost me because i dont want my subs and amps to be huge and noticable, id rather them be subtle and BUMP.
 

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dust4 said:
Wow. thanks for the very in depth approach. Maybe a little bit to technical for me even tho you spelled it out as much as you can. i appreciate it very much and honestly think i should just wait until i do have a bit more money. i have a jvc kd ax2 deck in. maybe ill just stop the rattling for now. cause i think what mim looking for is gonna cost me because i dont want my subs and amps to be huge and noticable, id rather them be subtle and BUMP.
I understand. I don't build SPL systems, I build SQ systems. Sure they get loud but they never lose their composure. Good equipment doesn't have to be big, you just have to know how to get what you want with the least amount of space loss. On the older Escape style you have a spare tire that isn't there on the newer models, so things are different for you. you might want to stay tuned to "The J's" system I'm helping him put together. Fully stealth, just like your model year too.
viewtopic.php?f=9&t=3254

Deadening will run about $180 or so, complete. Register with DIYMA, and you'll find that ANT of Secondskin has put together a promo with his new black Damplifier deadener product at a discount. That will run you under $100 and do 40 sq. feet...pretty much the whole car and then some. Remember with deadener like this, full coverage isn't necessary...roughly 25% coverage is good, and you focus on the non-curved metal of the car floor, doors, and side panels. Curves are stronger so there is no resonance there.

Next, in the same site order up some closed-cell foam to go over ALL the trunk, and the doors over your deadener and the metal. You want to cover 100% where possible. This should be attached with spray adhesive...strong stuff don't go for crappy Home Depot 3M spray it just doesn't hold.

Next, go to the http://www.sounddeadenershowdown.com website and order up some mass loaded vinyl, enough to cover at least the rear trunk floor. You can also pony up for enough to go into the doors and tailgate if you want. This step is optional but it pays great dividends in road noise and rattling.

Done!

edit: Oh yes, pick up a roller to roll on the deadener. You'll hate life doing it by hand alone.
 

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Hey guys, I have an 09 Escape that I recently built a sub box for. Unfortunately I don't have any pictures for you guys, but it rattles when the volume is really really low. I had an 04 Escape before this one that had 2 subs and no deadening that didnt rattle as bad as the new one. Being a college kid, I dont really have the cash to properly deaden the entire car or much of it at all for that matter. Does anyone know why it might rattle really badly without turning the volume up much at all? Thanks for the help.

-Steve
 

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Sub box leaks??
 

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SteveT said:
That can cause rattling? When I built it, I sealed it with silicone sealant so I dont think it should be leaking.
Define rattling. Because a leaking sub box makes for a noisy box. Also the sub could be rubbing its voice coil.
 

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Well, I looked up what rubbing a voice coil is, and I do not think that is it. I have never overpowered either of the subs before, they have both been run off the the 500/1 amp for their life. I will test my old box and see if I get the same sounds. Thanks for the input fourthmeal.
 

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SteveT said:
I installed my old box and there are absolutely no rattles. How could a box make so much noise?
Air leaks can do a whole lot. There's a lot of pressure being built up and then instantly reversed in a sealed speaker box, up to hundreds of times a second.
 

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I've had the license plate rattle, bolted the bottom down, now the door rattles too and have no idea. I've also busted a couple of license plate bulbs too! haha
 

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On my car, I noticed that the back windsheild motor cover that is inside the window was rattling on the window. Used a little velcro tape(soft side) and cover back side of the panel. No more rattle.
 
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