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Hi,

I have a 2010 Mariner Base I4 4WD.
On the driver side rear wheel well, had started to develop rust.
I went ahead and clean the area all the way to steel. I applied the rust corrosion prevention, primed it and repainted the arear around 4 weeks ago.
I notice that the paint started to bubble.
How can I fix this

Paul
 

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You have to use a "Rust Killer" 1st after getting back to bare steel , it'll prepare the steel for a paint , use a under coat stuff also with a preventative .
 

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This is a typical place where the rust hits on Escapes. To have a better idea of the extent of the rust in this wheel well, I suggest that you remove the panel facing this well, in the trunk. If no rust is present from the inside, lucky you, you just need to do a better cleaning and patching job, to prevent stones to pierce through the paint to the metal.
Scrape all the tar off to the metal, several inches further than where the rust stops.
Clean thoroughly (varsol, acetone)
Apply rust killer (those with phosphoric acid)
Clean again with acetone
Polyester resin, fiberglass mesh, polyester resin
2-3 layers of epoxy paint, à la POR15.
 

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smario259 said:
This is a typical place where the rust hits on Escapes. To have a better idea of the extent of the rust in this wheel well, I suggest that you remove the panel facing this well, in the trunk. If no rust is present from the inside, lucky you, you just need to do a better cleaning and patching job, to prevent stones to pierce through the paint to the metal.
Scrape all the tar off to the metal, several inches further than where the rust stops.
Clean thoroughly (varsol, acetone)
Apply rust killer (those with phosphoric acid)
Great info! What brand of 'rust killer', though? Just straight phosphoric acid? CLR? Gel rust remover comes in 8 oz, I see.
 

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I cannot tell the concentration of phosphoric acid in those that I use (any offered in auto parts store). I just know about their presence from the first aid treatment section. The gelled one is more interesting when there are vertical surfaces, to prevent drip. The rust becomes black, the bare metal becomes a half-matte grey. It happens quite quickly. I assume that this give a better surface for the paint and resins to better stick. Do not let it dry in place, as it may form crystals which I don't know if they are made of a corrosive matter.
 

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I have surface rust around my right rear shock area. Rustproofer shop said "don't bother cleaning it all off, and don't bother with the fender restoration either."

Escape has 136,000 km on it. All else is clean. Why would he say "don't bother"?
 

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Why would he say don't bother? Well, it is not HIS truck. If you did bother, and were able to slow down the corrosion, then he would not have body work to do...
Do as you see fit. I would need a picture to figure it out, but generally, grinding away rust, covering with a good rust-resistant primer, and finally paint would be my non-specific process.
I have closed the drain outlets on the doors and liftgate, dripped in some ATF and allowed it to seep in place, then removed the plugs to slow down internal rust in the doors and gate. Will it work? I don't know. Can't hurt, I figure. The guys on youtube at 'sweet project cars' channel, I think, recommended it to prevent rust.
If you have paint surrounding a rusty area, it is always(IMO) a good idea to check that the rust has not worked its way under the coating. Scrape or brush to insure the paint is sticking to the metal securely. If it flakes off, keep brushing to remove all flaky coating until you reach an area where it is still adhering. The oxidation can get under the paint, and go to town without you being able to see the process in action. Once you have reached firmly attached paint, then clean/sand/etc and prime newly exposed area, and paint as desired. If you do, you have just prevented some rust that was in your future.
tom
 

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tomw said:
Why would he say don't bother? Well, it is not HIS truck. If you did bother, and were able to slow down the corrosion, then he would not have body work to do...
This was the oil-spray shop, though. I think he was talking like I have ten grand to toss around on another 'disposable' vehicle.

The rear right fender was fixed by the previous owner, but the repair needs to be repaired. I got a reasonable offer from an actual body shop to cut out the section and replace with new metal fender shape.

Another body shop guy said he wouldn't take my money either. What a weird bum steer.
 

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When you see rusty areas through the dried tar, the water has been seeping under it since a while. Can be not that bad, or it can also be too late. There's only one way to know. The picture that I showed was just at the start of scraping. At the end the whole inner well area was scraped to the metal, as I found a constellation of small holes in the sheetmetal. (special thanks to my friend the craftsman Hammerhead) Water had found its way into the trunk and at the edges of the back seats, close to the doors. I had to repeat the job from the inside too. Before I started the repair there only were a couple of visible rusty spots. Surprise! That was six years ago. So far so good, I haven't reworked it.

The oil spray is another method. You have to redo it regularly to keep it moist. On the bad side it makes the underside of the car very filthy as the dust collects on it. Would have it prevented this type of corrosion? I don't know. But it's better than nothing. The "tar" used by Ford looks like dried acrylic bubble coating.

Given the residual value of the vehicle and the time involved for a good job, I can understand body shops showing no interest in doing such repairs. They rather a fender bender on a recent car, paid by the insurance companies.
 

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smario259 said:
When you see rusty areas through the dried tar, the water has been seeping under it since a while. ... Water had found its way into the trunk and at the edges of the back seats, close to the doors.
Oh, no, that's unfortunate--but mine has no sign of water in the cargo carpet or right rear seat. (Actually, I use a pair of dollar store 'moisture eliminator' canisters in the cabin and cargo area. Just my notion of keeping the interior bone dry as it's always humid here!)

My mechanic recommended a body shop which agreed to do the fender surgery for ~350 bucks. Jeez, why not pay it? An alternator replace costs more!

Just found it strange that rustproof shop and paint shop guys are just "get rid of the car" when to me the damage is arrest-able with some cash and elbow grease--even if not absolutely fixable.
 

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If that area is rusted, others are. Most body shops work for insurance money and just like replacing and painting in new panels and don't like small rust jobs. You have to find smaller shops. Any rust repair is all labor and you don't know what you will find until you get deeper into it. So any estimate usually cost the shop more, so they avoid it.
 
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