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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Have you ever been scared while driving? What was your scariest moment?

I've never been truly scared while driving, although there have been a few moments where I should have been scared.

The first one, going to work in Stratford in the middle of winter, I had my defroster on only the #2 setting because the air was not warm yet. Suddenly, the entire windshield completely freezes over so that I have zero visibility. I crank the blower up to 4, and knowing the road was clear and knowing all the little curves from driving it before, I used the rearview mirror to drive forwards while stopping the car. After that, I always had my defroster on 4 for the first few kilometres of driving, cold air or not.

Second one was going to my parents' house in Mississauga. I was on the Eastbound 401 just past James Snow Parkway, doing about 70 km/h when I should have been doing 50 km/h. I was passing a black F-150 in the right-hand lane, and I was followed by a big transport truck. As I started my lane change back to the right, my front right tire got bogged down in the mountain of slush between lanes. I gave it too much gas and the tire broke loose, the front wobbled, and then the rear broke loose. Soon I found myself doing a clockwise turn in front of a transport truck. I did the fastest palm-steering I have ever done and got myself moving towards the left lane while doing a spin.

I did a full 360, tried to recover, then the back end broke loose again seconds later. After 180 degrees on this second spin, I was too close to the concrete divider to recover again and the front passenger corner went into it. I cracked my front bumper in half and lost the bottom mounting tabs of my right headlamp.

A year later around the same time, I was on Essa Road in Barrie, going down a large hill. In the lanes coming up the hill, I noticed a stalled transport truck and a sideways city bus. A traffic light had turned red at the bottom of the hill, but it was after an ice storm and all I could get was the grinding of ABS - my car was actually speeding up down the hill. I turned on my four-ways and started to bump my front tire against the snowbank, enough to slow me down but not enough to break the rear loose. Luckily, all the cars behind me took my cue and did the same, so no one rear-ended me. Soon after that, this section of road was closed down while they spread salt or sand on it.

This next one is something that could have ended up in the news. 'Unfortunate motorist freezes to death minutes from rescue.' I was taking back roads at 1 AM from Waterloo to Orillia, as the 401-400 route takes a detour through the Toronto area. It was right after one of the big storms last December, and some of the roads had not been plowed yet.

I turned onto this road with about six inches of snow on it, which by experience was easily handled by the Escape. I crested a small hill and drove towards a valley in the road, and then my windshield was covered in snow and my car came right to a stop and would not budge. It turns out that all the snow from the fields had blown into this valley, collecting in about three feet of compacted snow.

I forced my door open (almost had to climb out through the window) and surveyed the damage. No damage to my car, but it was obvious that it was not going anywhere on its own. My cell phone had no signal and I could see no lights telling me there were houses nearby. I explored the area on my GPS, and found that Fergus was within hiking distance, about 7 km away. Without that GPS, I would have had no sense of direction and probably wandered farther out into the boonies. I put on my miner's light, grabbed a few light sticks and one of those crank flashlights, and went on my way. After one or two kilometres, I came to a larger highway and flagged down a snowplow. It turns out I had found the only one in the area with a passenger seat. :D I got a ride into Fergus and called a tow truck from a Tim Hortons.

At first, the tow truck dispatcher refused to send one to my area, as too many of their own trucks had been getting stuck. Knowing that my car was stuck in the middle of the road and not knowing what a plow would do to it in the morning, I finally convinced them to send a truck out to do some recon, and I would pay for their time, recovery or not. It took half an hour and two different routes to finally get within sight of my car. The tow truck's 80-ft winch was not long enough to reach me, but I had two 20-foot recovery straps in my car. We hooked them all together, shovelled enough snow away from the front of the car, and finally pulled it out.

The tow truck driver was really nice, said he did me a favour by driving so far and risking his rig because I had been honest about how badly I was stuck. He had had a few cases where he recovered the car, found out that he was stuck, and the car just drove away around him, sometimes without paying. He was also surprised that I had all my own recovery equipment, and had fun watching the stretchiness of the recovery straps compared to his winch cable. I lost feeling in three of my fingers for two weeks after that.

The latest incident was in the Escort, driving south on Highway 11 a few months ago. I was in the left lane passing a transport truck, when that truck drifted to the left and the truck's tires caught the slush buildup between our lanes. The Escort's wipers had no chance of keeping up, and now I was doing 90 km/h blind. Looking out the side windows, I could see how far away I was from both the centre guardrail and the transport truck beside me. I managed to speed up and get away by looking sideways while driving forward.

Then there are the typical cases where someone turns left right in front of me, a pedestrian jumps in front of my car (happens a LOT on campus), or someone tries to merge right into me.
 

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and that kids...is why you don't live in Canada :lol:

Scariest moment was when I got rear ended in my Blazer, Halloween '07... I was going less than 25 mph on the edge of the local college campus (William & Mary), and an Apple Door company truck with like a billion ladders on top wasn't paying attention when a bunch of cars in front of me stopped to let college kids walk thru a crosswalk. I almost rear ended the person in front of me, and I saw him coming up in my rearview but there wasn't anything I could do- curb and sidewalk to one side and oncoming traffic on the other. He swerved to try and avoid me, but that didn't quite work all the way. Thank god he didn't hurt my tailgate, and thank god none of those stupid ladders flew off his truck onto me... Result, along with alot of screaming and tears:



I especially like his license plate imprint in my bumper...he was a jerk :mad:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Spark757 said:
and that kids...is why you don't live in Canada :lol:
I see what this is aboot. You're just jealous that you don't get to live in igloos, eh?
 

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Gosh, this IS a tuff one. Been driving 45years (in October) and NO accidents.... :yahoo: Let me try to recall my scariest moment.... There have been a few......... :popcorn:
 

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highway 400/11 and highway 60. and 401.

no stories required. if you spent anytime driving any of those in the winter. you will be scared!!
 

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:pics:

Hmmm.... there were the two occasions when my brakes totally vanished while cruising in the Valiant (darn single master cylinder); the first time I was coming down Dilworth Mountain and had to navigate into the apple orchard at the bottom, the second was in Vancouver in evening traffic and I was able to use a hill to slow to a stop.

Then there was the time I was making good time on the Trans-Canada Highway, doing about 70 mph through the Fraser Valley when my exhaust pipe dropped off the slant six manifold and wedged into the steering linkage, jamming tight against the pitman arm so I lost all ability to steer. Thankfully the road stayed straight long enough for me to come to a stop.

Or -- similar to squishy's tale -- it was spring thaw on the Hope-Princeton Highway which twists and turns through the mountains in southern British Columbia. The canvas & rubber bag that holds the windshield washer fluid on the old Valiant ripped and lost its contents, leaving me with no way of cleaning the windshield so I retrieved a bottle of windex from the trunk and drove in near-freezing weather at night using the spray bottle & wiper blades (leaning out the driver's window as far as I could) every time a large truck passed me from the opposite direction (which would spray my entire vehicle with a thick coat of road grime from a winter of sanding). Visibility was next to nil, and a few times I hit the gravel before correcting my path.

Or, maybe it was the time I was cruising up Knox Mountain way back in high school when I spotted a buddy in his 1964 Valiant (almost the twin to mine) parked at one of the scenic outlooks with his girlfriend. Deciding to "scare" the amorous couple, I tried the high-speed pass not taking the loose gravel into account, and when I cranked the steering wheel my Valiant kept moving forward in a straight line, slamming into the side of the other car and almost pushing it over the edge. (At least I got some spare parts off his Valiant when he scrapped it soon after).

That's probably enough for now....
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
CrashNburn said:
highway 400/11 and highway 60. and 401.

no stories required. if you spent anytime driving any of those in the winter. you will be scared!!
Hey, I live there! :D

It's no sweat 355 days out of the year.
 

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I have experienced, a few scary moments over the years. Nothing in particular comes to mind. When driving in the country areas, i focus the mind to be alert for creatures such as : Foxes.....Rabbits.....Koala Bears and Kangaroos.

Fortunately the roads are free of traffic at night. If these animals cross my path, i obviously take evasive action. It will depend on the situation. My procedure is to do an emergency brake stop, or i might swerve to avoid them. Have not progressed into a dangerous slide, because i do not drive with excessive speed.

I only swerve the car, if it is safe enough to do this. My preferred course of action, is the stopping procedure or just brake enough to slow down. Some people might regard, my evasive actions as unecessary. The main reason is that, i have no desire for bits of road kill meat on the escape. Me is very squeamish.

Could not tolerate, observing blood and meat anywhere on the car. The scary periods for me, would have been avoiding kangaroos. These roos are very tall , and tend to be reasonably solid. Without some type of bull bar on car, these roos can inflict considerable damage on grill and panels.
 

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I vote for a new title for this thread:

Reasons why NOT to ride with Squishy

:bill:
 

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Scooter Scott said:
I vote for a new title for this thread:

Reasons why NOT to ride with Squishy

:bill:
:lol: :clap:

My scariest was also the stupidest. After a racquetball match I was on I-15 north just south of Fallbrook exit (think the Autobahn of San Diego County)...a car (BMW 3 something I think) weaving in and out of traffic and got to our cluster of cars and wanted a spot in front of me...that didn't exist! He took it and to avoid contact I swerved toward the center median and cut back to avoid the median which sent me spinning across all the lanes of traffic. The fact that one else got hit as I was spinning is a miracle. Well the car finally came to the shoulder and witnesses said the car cart-wheeled and flipped 6-7 times, I ended up on the roof about 100ft down the embankment. I unbuckled hit the roof, turned over and crawled out of the car stood up and there was my car upside down...the dust was still settling. I felt fine, some scratces and such, they did the whole trip to the trama unit and the nine yards.

I'll see if I can dig up the pictures of the aftermath.

The really scary part was retrieving my personal items out of the car the next day at the tow yard...my subs I had in there had been stolen that night! The funny thing is the cops actually found them! I sold 'em, at the time things like that weren't important to me after the accident.

The take away? Ease up and give more space.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The take away - BMW drivers are dicks! :lol: :mad:
 

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Squishy said:
The take away - BMW drivers are dicks! :lol: :mad:
Not so fast Mister! :stop: I used to drive a BMW. I never did any pushing into spaces that didn't exist while driving. ;-| I did drive fast, still tend to do so, but like he said above, make space. :thumb: I do, I'm not the fastest driver out there by any means. ;) :peace:
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Exception that proves the rule? You did abandon BMW for Ford... :angel:
 

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Nah! It's more like the BMW, Mercedes, Buicks, Chevy Pickups and Dodges were aberrations in my nearly spotless record of Ford ownership, when I was led away by false promises and pretty faces. Only to discover the reality of owning a true POS. ;)
 

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:stop: Exception #2...my twin had a 7 series, he was very safe. Fast driver yes but never reckless. Just replaced it with an Audi A4 Avant.
 

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My scariest moments both were while learning to ride a motorcycle. I started (and nearly ended on) a 78 Honda CB750, a big slow cruiser style bike. First time I almost crapped on it was coming off the interstate onto a cloverleaf exit, a very sharp 25 mph turn. As I entered, I realized I was going too fast and slowed down, thereby standing the bike up and heading straight towards the outer shoulder, and beyond that Staples parking lot lol. I then panicked, gunned it and (suprisingly) didn't spin out but shot out onto the highway I was entering waaaay too fast with my heart in by throat.

The second time I was going for a ride in unfamiliar country, on Vt. Route 100 through the heart of Vermont. Very beautiful country, I never go out there but I knew I was headed vaguely home. I was admiring some particularly spectacular view when I passed, unnoticed, a sign showing a sharp turn and side road ahead, cruised at 55 mph up a gentle hill, then looked ahead as the tarmac veered suddenly to the right and a dirt road (Thank God) suddenly appeared under my shaking handlebars. Going 55 mpg off tarmac onto a dirt road on a motorcycle is not a good idea, I found out, but there was no traffic around and I managed to slow without panicking and turned around in a driveway and went back to the intersection and rejoined Route 100.

I've sinced learned that, on a motorcycle, paying attention is ALOT more important than in a car :doh:
 

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Ajax said:
I've sinced learned that, on a motorcycle, paying attention is ALOT more important than in a car :doh:
Ummm.

Yeah!

Attention to detail is a definite positive factor to survival whilst riding a scooter of any sort. :rockon: Doesn't hurt to pay attention to where your going in a car or truck either. :roll:
 

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Re: Scariest moment while driving?

Dunno, you'd have to ask the passengers on the coach......................... (Insert Devil smiley):whistle: :whistle: ;)
 

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Seeing flashing lights behind me...that always makes my heart skip a beat.
 

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Dasha said:
Seeing flashing lights behind me...that always makes my heart skip a beat.
Agreed! :angel:

Turn around and flash'em back with those pearly whites! BLING! :lol:
 
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