Ford Escape Automobiles Forum banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,541 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Thought some here might be interested... :)

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2330364,00.asp

--------------------------------------

Tesla Motors Offers 'Powertrain Upgrade'
09.12.08

by Jamie Lendino

Tesla Motors released a much-awaited revision to the transmission in the all-electric Roadster, and in typical software upgrade fashion, the company is calling it Powertrain 1.5, as Autopia reports. The new one-speed Borg-Warner transmission "joins a stouter power inverter and revised engine in a package said to deliver 30 percent more torque and 10 percent more range."

Installing this update is a little more complicated than, say, patching Windows Vista (as complex as that can get at times). For the 27 Roadsters that are already tearing up the streets, they'll need to go back to the dealer to get retrofitted, which the company claims can be done in a four-hour swap.

Tesla Roadster owners will want the upgrade. The new one-speed transmission weighs 17 pounds less and creates less drag on the motor, increasing efficiency and bumping the car's range., the report said. "A revised power inverter puts out 850 amps, up from 650, and the motor had redesigned terminals to reduce resistance. It's beefier, too, and torque rises from 211 foot-pounds to 280."

Originally posted on TechnoRide.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,541 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
arbs said:
not heard of tesla before - is it a US brand?
Its headquarters is located in California, US but the Signature Edition is sold exclusively in Europe. They are fairly new and not cheap. In fact, I believe 2008 was the first model year. I only heard about them last year after one of the members of this site (Prowler) posted about them on another site.

You can read more about them on their website: http://www.teslamotors.com/learn_more/our_company.php
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,541 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
BTW... If you look at the end of the fine print at the bottom of this website you will notice a link to Tesla-Central :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
256 Posts
RobtRoma said:
Thought some here might be interested... :)

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2330364,00.asp

--------------------------------------

Tesla Motors Offers 'Powertrain Upgrade'
I like PC Mag articles - they talk like it's a PC with wheels . . . .

Here's their "Automobile 2.0" article that contributed to my decision to buy one:

http://www.pcmag.com/print_article2/0,1 ... 221,00.asp

Tesla Roadster: Test Driving Your Electric Dream Car
ARTICLE DATE: 03.29.07
By Cade Metz

Dear PC Magazine reader: I just took a ride in your dream car. If there was ever a vehicle whose design was inspired by PC technology, it's the Tesla Roadster, a 100-percent electric car under development at a 170-person startup just south of San Francisco.

Due on the market this fall, at a price of $92,000, the Tesla is powered by the same lithium-ion battery cells that drive the average laptop or smartphone, and you can charge it from an ordinary wall socket. There's even a grate under the rear fender where the car expels hot air, just like the typical desktop PC.

?Introducing the Tesla Roadster
Several prototypes are already assembled, and last night, I was invited down to the company's Silicon Valley offices for a spin down the freeway. No, I didn't get to drive. Each prototype was built at a cost of over a million dollars, and only the lucky few covered by the company insurance policy are permitted behind the wheel. But I did get the rush of sitting in the passenger seat of this Lotus-like two-door convertible. And what a rush it is!

Equipped with an AC induction motor that's no larger than a watermelon, it does zero to 60 in about 4 seconds. But it's not just the acceleration that amazes. It's the way this car accelerates. Unlike a gasoline-powered car, which has very little torque at low RPMs, the Tesla reaches 100 percent torque from the instant it starts forward. You don't wait even a moment for that acceleration to kick in. It kicks in immediately. The effect is like nothing you've ever experienced.

And that's not the half of it. Even as it reaches the performance of leading sports cars, emissions are non-existent - when I say 100 percent electric, I mean 100 percent electric - and according to the company, the car gets the equivalent of 135 miles to the gallon. Translation: If you charge your car at night, during off-peak hours, when it makes the most sense to charge it, you're paying as little as one cent per mile.

The Tesla has yet to be independently tested - the final version doesn't roll off the assembly line until the fall - and what you may save powering the car is certainly offset by the initial $92,000 price tag. But it's hard not to admire the Tesla simply as a feat of engineering.

The car's 900-pound battery, or Energy Storage System, includes 6,831 lithium-ion cells, each about the size of a double-A alkaline. Plugged into an ordinary wall socket, it charges in about 7 hours. But if you use a specially designed in-home charging unit, which the company plans to include with the car at no extra cost, you can charge up in under four hours. A full-charge gets you 250 miles of driving on the open road (the company has yet to test stop-and-go performance).

We get hands-on with V2V, GM's new car-to-car safety network.

According to Phil Luk, the Tesla engineer who hand-built each prototype, the battery is equipped with 13 separate processors that monitor everything from voltage and temperature to smoke levels. To maintain appropriate temperatures inside the battery, the car includes both radiator heating and a liquid-cooling system. And that wasn't a joke: The cooling vents in the rear of the car work much like the cooling vents on an ordinary desktop PC.

The AC motor weighs a mere 70 pounds, and there are no more than two moving parts. It sits in the rear of the car, along with the battery and the cooling system. Under the hood, you'll find only the radiator and an air conditioning unit (the one used to cool the passengers).

The entire package is monitored and controlled by an onboard computer known as the PEM (Power Electronics Module), also situated in the rear of the car. The Linux-based PEM controls and monitors everything from the speed and rotation of the motor to braking and battery charging. From a digital display just under the steering wheel, you can monitor performance stats on your own. You can even see if someone has recently opened the trunk. Like I said: This is your dream car.

Get more automotive technology news and reviews in our Cars Product Guide, or on our sister site, Technoride.

Copyright (c) 2007 Ziff Davis Media Inc. All Rights Reserved.


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
256 Posts
RobtRoma said:
arbs said:
not heard of tesla before - is it a US brand?
Its headquarters is located in California, US but the Signature Edition is sold exclusively in Europe. They are fairly new and not cheap. In fact, I believe 2008 was the first model year. I only heard about them last year after one of the members of this site (Prowler) posted about them on another site.[/url]
Yes, 2008 is the first year. Production Unit #1 was delivered in February to the Elon Musk, the Chairman, with start-up production starting mid-March with the temporary transmission. The 2008 model year will be 600 units, was sold out ages ago, and will run roughly through first quarter of 2009 (or as long as it takes to produce 600 units). Ultimate production rate is about 1200/year. There's now 27 delivered with a total of 50 started (including the 27).

2009 is either sold out, or just about. It will run a half-year, roughly second and third 2009 calendar quarters. The 25 European units will be early 2009 cars. The exchange rate drove Tesla to sell in Europe, they peaked at something like double the original cost when the exchange rate peaked (or dipped, from our point of view).

It's interesting that, although assembled by Lotus in England, the European edition was not intended for sale in England since they only planned to make lefthand steering cars. I don't know if they changed this, or are getting a waiver for righthand. The following might have something to do with it, published earlier this month by Edmund's:
Tesla Motors top brass have fully turned their attention to the Europe market, issuing a gushing press release early Monday about His Royal Highness Prince Michael of Kent's drive in the Roadster. Prince Michael "has become the first member of the British Royal Family to get behind the wheel of the new Tesla Roadster," the company said in a statement. "He was particularly encouraged by the zero-emissions technology being developed by Tesla Motors," the company noted.

They announced the price of 2010's (again, 2009 is either sold out, or only a couple of slots left) at a large increase.

With the delays in purchase, some people have dropped out for 2008's. They're pushing these slots to the end (I hope that means that I move up a bit from #400, due in January?) and they're selling these slots at a premium.

Of course, I don't like the 6-month delay, but with the improvements, it's worth it - zero-to-60 in 3.9 seconds, faster quarter-mile since there's NO shifting, 30% more torque, 10% more range, better "mpg" - the official EPA rating is 244 mile range and 244 mpg-equivalent (yes, the CAFE rating is REALLY 244 mpg). In any case, AN ELECTRIC CAR SHOULD NOT HAVE A TRANSMISSION - and now it doesn't!

I can give more details (some inside) if anyone is interested.

-Sparky
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top