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I had a power steering hose leak which lead to replacing the pump and pressure hose. If you have ever had to change the high pressure hose on an 05 escape 3.0 you already know how much fun it is. I chose to remove the radiator,and transmission cooler to access the power steering pump. I'm not a fan of working laying under the vehicle if it can be avoided. Anyway, I was referred to this person by a friend. The dude did well with power steering pump and line. However when it came to putting radiator and trani cooler he somehow mixed up the hoses. Pumped water/coolant into trani and trani fuid to radiator/reservoir.....Made a real big pink mess when it blew out the side of the reservoir after it had driven approx 2.5 miles...Any ideas as to wth I need to do other than the obvious? Being buy a new trani. Anyone who has any knowledge of tansmission problems with the 05 knows it's no punk to remove and or replace trani...I am pretty on point with my mechanic skills but this car has definitely been a challange. Dude vanished first chance he got for anyone wandering..
 

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That happened to my brother's Jeep Grand Cherokee V8, but the radiator failed and did that dirty deed on its own. He traded the car on the spot.

Sorry to hear that happened to you. Given the difficulty in removing that trans, I would take a flyer on it and try flushing the trans with trans flush and new transmission fluid. Buy the cheapest Mercon you can find and if it works out, swap it out again with Mercon V in a couple of months.

Best of luck.

John
 

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The biggest issue with coolant/water in the transmission is that the clutch material is held to the plates with water soluble glue.

I have had 2 oil to water (the transmission cooler is internal to the radiator) fail and cause strawberry milk in the radiator, and very little in the transmissions because the transmission fluid was at a higher pressure.

I an unclear on how they could attach the transmission lines which are small, and very large radiator hoses, was the coolant side of the overflow connected to one of the transmission lines? Is the the pink mess only in the coolant side, or also in the transmission? Is it just a failed cooler in the radiator tank?

I had to run a variety of degreaser through the cooling side to finally get rid of the oil slick that would emulsify and clog up everything.
 

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Unless the mechanic crossed the transmission cooler and power steering cooler... and applied high pressure to the cooler, there's no real way for coolant to mix with the transmission fluid other than a failed cooler. The transmission cooler as I understand is a part of the radiator, mounted forward of the normal radiator tubes/fins, down at the bottom. I thought the PS cooler was a totally separate item. If the trans cooler that is part of the radiator got damaged or finally gave out, it could mix coolant and transmission fluid. If the power steering got connected to the transmission cooler, I am not sure if there would be enough pressure to damage the cooler. I think the power steering cooler is a 'loop' of tubing that is even more in front of the radiator and transmission cooler AND the A/C condenser. Just goes over and back in front of all the finned parts, and does not have fins. I do not think either transmission or power steering would produce enough pressure to damage, but may be.

Were it my truck, I would get a pressure test on both the radiator and transmission cooler. If both pass(unlikely) the radiator and cooler both need to be flushed, the transmission needs to have 5-6qts drained/refilled and that function repeated a couple times until the drained comes out looking normal. The cooling system would also need to be flushed(in addition to the radiator, or maybe at the same time) and perhaps the hoses replaced as they do not like transmission fluid and may deteriorate(likely, not instant, but over time)
Is it possible the radiator got torqued a bit when removed?(twisted one way or another?) The tanks at either end seem to get brittle with age, and tend to seep coolant. Given the engine and transmission coolers are part of the same assembly, just moving could have opened a connection between them allowing coolant and transmission fluid to mix. That's the reason to pressure test them both. You do both because one may seal the leak under pressure, but pressure on the opposite side could open the connection.
tom
 

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Sorry this happened to you. I have to agree with @JohnCT about replacing the transmission fluid.

You do need to be careful with the fluid you use. This comes from the 2005 Ford Escape Owner Manual.

"Ensure the correct automatic transmission fluid is used. Transmission fluid requirements are indicated on the dipstick blade. MERCON and MERCON V are not interchangeable. DO NOT mix MERCON and MERCON V."
 

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"Ensure the correct automatic transmission fluid is used. Transmission fluid requirements are indicated on the dipstick blade. MERCON and MERCON V are not interchangeable. DO NOT mix MERCON and MERCON V."
Correct, they are not to be mixed - and just to be clear- Ford now specifies Mercon V for older CD4E applications with a full fluid swap. I replaced my Mercon with V in my 05 but did a full fluid swap, not a partial dump and fill to make sure I didn't mix them. Running well at 190K miles.

Some other brave E-C poster went as far as to replace their Mercon with LV. He's reported good luck with that swap but I confess I wouldn't try LV in a CD4E box without Ford's official Okey-Dokey.

John
 

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You know what else is low viscosity? Water.

It wasn't designed for it, I wouldn't put it in it. Stick with the current Mercon V that Ford sells, that another manufacturer has licensed, or if you can't find it, a multi purpose one that specifically states it meets the Ford requirement, I wouldn't do any Mercon LV or Dexron VI compatible fluid.

Solve the current issue the correct way with the correct fluid. if it can be, I bet it can be, I think you only say the mixing in the coolant, nothing saying you got strawberry milk or have tried draining the transmission. I also would guess the radiator decided at this point to break, and that is where the coolant and the transmission fluid are mixing.
 
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No the radiator did not get twisted and nothing was twisted or tweaked. It was 100% human error because the guy underestimated my mechanical skills as a woman. Yes I had pink milkshake all over the place. After filling and dumping 5 or 6 times. (Yes with 10 quarts of trani fluid at 12.99 a quarter. ) Over $300 dollars later I heard a slight noise that sounded like a vacuum noise it will not shift into any gear. Prior to the noise it was shifting a little hard into all gears. I'm confused as to what the difference between allowing trani to drain into a bucket thru trani line while running vehicle or leaving trani line on and filling, running vehicle thru all the gears and then dumping. After 5 times of going filling and dumping trani fluid was still a bit milky.
 

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Over $300 dollars later I heard a slight noise that sounded like a vacuum noise it will not shift into any gear.

If the trans won't engage, the last "easy" option is to pull the side cover and remove the valve body and clean that. I'm not a trans tech so I don't know if you can check line pressure from the pump first (maybe Tom?) before you pull the valve body out. If the pump died, you have to pull the trans.

If the pump is still working, removing, disassembling the valve body, cleaning it and reinstalling it may get it working. The last option of course is to buy a remanned trans and install it.

If you plan on replacing the trans, make sure you completely flush the cooler and lines and I means spotless.

I'
m confused as to what the difference between allowing trani to drain into a bucket thru trani line while running vehicle or leaving trani line on and filling, running vehicle thru all the gears and then dumping. After 5 times of going filling and dumping trani fluid was still a bit milky.
By using the coolant lines and letting the trans pump itself out, there is far less mixing (there is still some unfortunately) and you can accomplish a much better swap with much less fluid.

When I first bought my 05, the trans was running fine but the fluid looked like used motor oil. I threw caution to the wind and disconnected the coolant line and with my wife starting and stopping the engine, I ended swapping probably 99% of the fluid with 12 quarts. By the 12th quart, the fluid coming out was clear red.

Because you had a foreign substance in your trans, I would have elected to do the coolant line procedure and maybe run 15 quarts through it to make sure I got it all. A little clot of that pink slime could easily block a passage in the valve body.

Good luck.

John
 
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