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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm a bit flustered trying to find the best pattern for tire rotation on the Escape.
I rotate every other oil change and got spoiled with my 99 F150 4x4 which only had two sets of quiet running tires during 100+k, the first originals lasting 62K. I sold it with considerable and even tread at 105K.
I believe the Escape manual requests the same as 4x4 rear wheel, yet these are primarily FWD vehicles. With the exception of a hand-full of miles on off road rutted dusty trails,I know my 4x4 never engages from late spring and through the summer.
My tires got really noisy after last road trip, so I rotated as in diagram C. (Alignment is on, pressure always 33-35 psi,) They only got worse until next couple of oil changes I swapped them around to every configuration I could until they were quiet again. Honestly, I lost track as to which were where originally. :hyst: I do know the Escape wears the fronts much more quickly. My last round I used a micrometer and confirmed the most tread ended back up on the front.
I like a quiet ride. So tire wear fanatics, what works with these little beasts?

(image from tire rack)
 

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This will really come down to personal preference but I use "A" or a modified version of it when there is a full size tire as the spare. A and C are nearly identical with the only difference being which tires get crossed over. The only difference between the 2 is where the cross happens. But rotate the tires 4 times following either pattern and the wheel will end up in the original postion.

I also rotate every 2 oil changes to keep tread levels even. Although with the Escape and its extended oil change interval I'll probably rotate every oil change.
 

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i rotate my tires every 10,000km. actually the tire place does it, its part of the deal when you buy new shoes. i believe they just go front to back, back to front, no cross.
 

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I guess the stright front<-> back days are gone, something about the belts breaking in, in one direction, and if reversed broke, or cause some sort of problems...
(remeber I'm kinda young, but had a 66 'stang for my 2nd car and now have a 65 falcon)
 

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Actually when I was attending one of the auto shows (probably 5 years ago now) I visted the Michellin booth and the rep there still recommended the straight front to back rotation to keep the belts spinning in the same direction. I don't follow the philosophy however and still prefer to cross the tires from side to side to round out wear patterns.

My liberty has 30K miles on the Destination A/T's and the tread still looks brand new, save for rounding of the outter edges, thanks to proper rotation of the tires.
 

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It depends on the tire and the car/truck, imo. I prefer the C method, but the Mazda house does it for the Tribbie under the oil change and rotate service policy, and Discount Tire does it for the F-150 and the Bullitt as part of the tire deal. I think just doing it is smart, although I never did it years ago on my Marquis, my Fiesta, the Granada,... and the tires wore fine on those cars. :peace:
 

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If you have unidirectional tires, there's a snag (I know I have). I just move them back and forth from front to rear and vice-versa keeping the rotation of the wheel (without crossing them). Have 7 years on the said wheels and they look great.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Uh oh.. Perhaps just rotation regardless of format is better than nothing? I still contend these are FWD not AWD vehicles, unless your streets are coated in glycerin or ice year 'round only a few times when the system actually is activated.
I have a depth micrometer and can measure the fronts wearing faster. Makes sense with the drive, steering, and majority of the weight placed on the front set of tires. Wondering if pulling instead of pushing has an effect on the tread, requires a different rotation? When cupping or feathering is an issue, no directional tread rotation, I think the "A" cross over is a good idea to get the rotation going the other way.
If not I'm hedging towards "D" keeping left on left right on right and just swapping fronts and rear.
I'll try to keep better track next swap and see if they remain wearing evenly and quiet. I'm running Goodyear Integrity 235/70R16, (11/32" new tread) not the greatest rep for long wearing or quiet ride, but after last rotate and down to .24" of tread, pretty even across the face of the tires, now quiet again, I can't complain.
 

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There was also something to do with factory alignment settings, probably toe-in or toe-out, that had some influence on rotation pattern.

Honestly, tire construction has come so far in the last two decades that I will take a WAG and say it doesn't matter anymore, as long as you rotate them with a consistent pattern. I'll keep doing C for omnidirectional tires, and front-to-back for directional tires.
 
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